Highest growth in wound management sales to 2026 by product, region

Here we assess the specific products and geographic areas showing the highest growth in wound management product sales, drawn from our global report and its forecasts, “Wound Management, Forecast to 2026.”  Report S254.

We assess the 10-year sales size and growth for 13 different wound product segments worldwide, in major geographic regions and individual countries — USA, Rest of N. America, Latin America, Europe, United Kingdom, Spain, France, Germany, Italy, Rest of Europe, Asia/Pacific, Japan, Korea, China, Rest of Asia/Pacific, Rest of World.

Below we show the top 15 combinations of regional market and product segments in descending order of their compound annual growth rate from 2017 to 2026.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S254.

As becomes clear, the greatest relative growth in sales in the area of wound management is in several wound care product types — bioengineered skin & skin substitutes, growth factors — and the geographic regions of Japan, Rest of World, China, Germany, Asia-Pacific.  This reflects the high level of investment and attention in Asian markets, especially China.


The complete set of wound market forecast data, from 2016 to 2026, is available at 2018 Wound Management Report #S254, published March 2018.

 

USA slipping behind Asia/Pacific markets in wound care sales

We present data from our 2016 to 2026 forecast of the global market for wound management products (report #S254, published March 2018). 


At a glimpse, you can see the overall trend in global wound management, including the relative size of each market. (The four regional sales charts are shown on the same scale to illustrate this.)  Most notably, the USA dominance of this global market is fading, as aggregate Asia/Pacific sales of all wound products will eclipse USA sales within the forecast period.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S254.

Looking at just the aggregate of all wound product types, Asia/Pacific relative sales are squeezing out shares in every other region.Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S254.

When we then look specifically at the USA versus Asia/Pacific, it illustrates that by 2020, Asia/Pacific’s sales of wound management products will eclipse those of the U.S., making it the largest regional wound management market.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S254.

Changes in Fortunes for Wound Management Products

Over the 2017 to 2026 period, the compound annual growth rate for the entire wound management market will approach 6%, a respectable rate of growth for an established market, though not quite high enough to encourage investment in the market as a whole.

Of course, the total wound market is comprised of a number of VERY large, slow-growing segments, like traditional adhesive dressings, gauze dressings, and non-adherent dressings, which have annual sales at $3.8 billion, $3.2 billion, and $1.3 billion, respectively.

The large volume, slow growth of the aggregate masks growth in the following segments:

  • Bioengineered skin and skin substitutes
  • Alginates
  • Foam dressings
  • Growth factors

These wound care segments have had, and will continue to have, annual growth rates at or near double-digit through 2026.

The end result of variable growth rates is that the 2026 Wound Care Market (worldwide), by comparison to 2017, will show the following changes (up/down) in each segment’s share of the total market.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S254 (publishing Mar. 2018).

Bioengineered skin, alginates lead wound market growth

Big revenues, as in $ billions, are turned over every year in traditional wound dressings and gauze, while emerging technologies designed to have far more impact on wound management are driving the fastest percentage revenue growth. Data from “Wound Management to 2026” (report S254) shows the size-to-growth distribution of wound product revenue streams over the 2017 to 2026 period.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S254.

Wound management practice patterns, products by wound type

From Report #S251, “Wound Management to 2024”.

Surgical wounds account for the vast majority of skin injuries. We estimate that there are approximately 100 million surgical incisions per year, growing at 3.1% CAGR, that require some wound management treatment. About 16 million operative procedures were performed in acute care hospitals in the USA. Approximately 80% of surgical incisions use some form of closure product: sutures, staples, and tapes. Many employ hemostasis products, and use fabric bandages and surgical dressings.

Surgical procedures generate a preponderance of acute wounds with uneventful healing and a lower number of chronic wounds, such as those generated by wound dehiscence or postoperative infection. Surgical wounds are most often closed by primary intention, where the two sides across the incision line are brought close and mechanically held together. Overall the severity and size of surgical wounds will continue to decrease as a result of the continuing trend toward minimally invasive surgery.

Surgical wounds that involve substantial tissue loss or may be infected are allowed to heal by secondary intention where the wound is left open under dressings and allowed to fill by granulation and close by epithelialization. Some surgical wounds may be closed through delayed primary intention where they are left open until such time as it is felt it is safe to suture or glue the wound closed.

Traumatic wounds occur at the rate of 50 million or more every year worldwide. They require cleansing and treatment with low-adherent dressings to cover the wound, prevent infection, and allow healing by primary intention. Lacerations are a specific type of trauma wound that are generally minor in nature and require cleansing and dressing for a shorter period. There are approximately 20 million lacerations a year as a result of cuts and grazes; they can usually be treated in the doctors’ surgery, outpatient medical center or hospital A&E departments.

Burn wounds can be divided into minor burns, medically treated, and hospitalized cases. Outpatient burn wounds are often treated at home, at the doctor’s surgery, or at outpatient clinics. As a result, a large number of these wounds never enter the formal health service system. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), globally about 11 million people are burned each year severely enough to require medical treatment. We estimate that approximately 3.5 million burns in this category do enter the outpatient health service system and receive some level of medical attention. In countries with more developed medical systems, these burns are treated using hydrogels and advanced wound care products, and they may even be treated with consumer-based products for wound healing.

Medically treated burn wounds usually receive more informed care to remove heat from the tissue, maintain hydration, and prevent infection. Advanced wound care products are used for these wounds. There are approximately 6.0 million burns such as this that are treated medically every year.

Hospitalized burn wounds are rarer and require more advanced and expensive care. These victims require significant care, nutrition, debridement, tissue grafting and often tissue engineering where available. They also require significant follow-up care and rehabilitation to mobilize new tissue, and physiotherapy to address changes in physiology. Growth rates within the burns categories are approximately 1.0% per annum.

Chronic wounds generally take longer to heal, and care is enormously variable, as is the time to heal. There are approximately 7.4 million pressure ulcers in the world that require treatment every year. Many chronic wounds around the world are treated sub-optimally with general wound care products designed to cover and absorb some exudates. The optimal treatment for these wounds is to receive advanced wound management products and appropriate care to address the underlying defect that has caused the chronic wound; in the case of pressure ulcers a number of advanced devices exist to reduce pressure for patients. There are approximately 9.7 million venous ulcers, and approximately 10.0 million diabetic ulcers in the world requiring treatment. Chronic wounds are growing in incidence due to the growing age of the population, and the growth is also due to increasing awareness and improved diagnosis. Growth rates for pressure and venous ulcers are 6%–7% in the developed world as a result of these factors.

Diabetic ulcers are growing more rapidly due mainly to increased incidence of both Type I and maturity-onset diabetes in the developed countries around the world. The prevalence of diabetic ulcers is rising at 9% annually. Every year 5% of diabetics develop foot ulcers and 1% require amputation. The recurrence rate of diabetic foot ulcers is 66%; the amputation rate rises to 12% with subsequent ulcerations. At present, this pool of patients is growing faster than the new technologies are reducing the incidence of wounds by healing them.

Wound management products are also used for a number of other conditions including amputations, carcinomas, melanomas, and other complicated skin cancers, all of which are on the increase.

A significant feature of all wounds is the likelihood of pathological infection occurring. Surgical wounds are no exception, and average levels of infection of surgical wounds are in the range of 7%–10%, depending upon the procedure. These infections can be prevented by appropriate cleanliness, surgical discipline and skill, wound care therapy, and antibiotic prophylaxis. Infections usually lead to more extensive wound care time, the use of more expensive products and drugs, significantly increased therapist time, and increased morbidity and rehabilitation time. A large number of wounds will also be sutured to accelerate closure, and a proportion of these will undergo dehiscence and require aftercare for healing to occur.

For the detailed coverage of wounds, wound management products, companies, and markets, see report #S251, “Worldwide Wound Management to 2024”.

What is the ideal wound product?

The previously accepted wisdom was that a wound healed best when it was kept as dry as possible. In 1962, George Winter, a British-born physician, published his ground-breaking wound care research. His paper, (Nature 193:293. 1962), entitled, “Formation of the scab and the rate of epithelization of superficial wounds in the skin of the young domestic pig,” demonstrated that wounds kept moist healed faster than those exposed to the air or covered with a traditional dressing and kept dry. Dr. Winter’s work began the development of modern wound dressings which are used to promote moist wound healing.

Natural skin is considered the ideal wound dressing, and therefore wound dressings have been designed to try to reproduce the advantages of natural skin. Today, experts feel that a wound dressing should have several characteristics if it is to serve its purpose. A wound dressing should:

  • Provide the optimal moisture needs for the particular wound
  • Have the capacity to provide thermal insulation, gaseous exchange, and to help drainage and debris removal, which promotes tissue reconstruction
  • Be biocompatible without causing any allergic or immune response reaction
  • Protect the wound from secondary infections
  • Be easily removable without causing any trauma to the delicate healing tissues.

There are hundreds of dressings to choose from, but they all fall into one of a few categories. The healthcare provider will select a dressing by category, according to availability and familiarity of using that particular dressing.

Occlusive dressings are those which are air- and water-tight. An occlusive dressing is frequently made with some kind of waxy coating to ensure a totally water-tight bandage. It may also consist of a thin sheet of plastic affixed to the skin with tape. An occlusive dressing retains moisture, heat, body fluids and medication in the wound. There are several types of occlusive dressings, which are discussed below.

It should be remembered that proper wound care, especially of a chronic wound, is a complex process, as much art as science; a trained healthcare provider assesses the wound as it goes through various stages, and applies the appropriate wound dressings as the need arises. Unfortunately, the most appropriate dressing is not always used, due perhaps to confusion around which type of dressing to apply, or because certain dressings—especially advanced dressings—either may not be available in the facility, or may not be reimbursed by the country’s healthcare system, or may simply be too expensive. This remains true even in some of the developed countries.

The following table summarizes potential applications for various types of wound care products, with selected examples. This summary is meant as a guideline and an illustration of the fact that different dressing types may find use in various types of wounds. In addition, as a wound heals, it may need a different type of dressing. Here again the wound care professional’s judgment and training come into play.

Dressing categoryProduct examplesDescriptionPotential applications
FilmHydrofilm, Release, Tegaderm, BioclusiveComes as adhesive, thin transparent polyurethane film, and as a dressing with a low adherent pad attached to the film.Clean, dry wounds, minimal exudate; also used to cover and secure underlying absorptive dressing, and on hard-to-bandage locations, such as heel.
FoamPermaFoam, PolyMem, BiatainPolyurethane foam dressing available in sheets or in cavity filling shapes. Some foam dressing have a semipermeable, waterproof layer as the outer layer of the dressingFacilitates a moist wound environment for healing. Used to clean granulating wounds which have minimal exudate.
HydrogelHydrosorb Gel Sheet, Purilon, Aquasorb, DuoDerm, Intrasite Gel, Granugel,Colloids which consist of polymers that expand in water. Available in gels, sheets, hydrogel-impregnated dressings.Provides moist wound environment for cell migration, reduces pain, helps to rehydrate eschar. Used on dry, sloughy or necrotic wounds.
HydrocolloidCombiDERM, Hydrocoll, Comfeel, DuoDerm CGF Extra Thin, Granuflex, TegasorbÕ Nu-DermMade of hydroactive or hydrophilic particles attached to a hydrophobic polymer. The hydrophilic particles absorb moisture from the wound, convert it to a gel at the interface with the wound. Conforms to wound surface; waterproof and bacteria proof.Gel formation at wound interface provides moist wound environment. Dry necrotic wounds, or for wounds with minimal exudate. Also used for granulating wounds.
AlginateAlgiSite, Sorbalgon Curasorb, Kaltogel, Kaltostat, SeaSorb, TegagelA natural polysaccharide derived from seaweed; available in a range of sizes, as well as in ribbons and ropes.Because highly absorbent, used for wounds with copious exudate. Can be used in rope form for packing exudative wound cavities or sinus tracts.
AntimicrobialBiatain Ag, Atrauman Ag, MediHoneyBoth silver and honey are used as antimicrobial elements in dressings.Silver: Requires wound to be moderately exudative to activate the silver, in order to be effective
NPWDSNaP, V.A.C. Ulta, PICO, Renasys (not in USA), Prospera PRO series, Invia LibertyComputerized vacuum device applies continuous or intermittent negative or sub-atmospheric pressure to the wound surface. NPWT accelerates wound healing, reduces time to wound closure. Comes in both stationary and portable versions.May be used for traumatic acute wound, open amputations, open abdomen, etc. Seems to increase burn wound perfusion. Also used in management of DFUs. Contraindicated for arterial insufficiency ulcers. Not to be used if necrotic tissue is present in over 30% of the wound.
Bioengineered Skin and Skin SubstitutesAlloDerm, AlloMax, FlexHD, DermACELL, DermaMatrix, DermaPure, Graftjacket Regenerative Tissue Matrix, PriMatrix, SurgiMend PRS, Strattice Reconstructive Tissue Matrix, Permacol, EpiFix, OASIS Wound Matrix, Apligraf, Dermagraft, Integra Dermal Regeneration Template, TransCyteBio-engineered skin and soft tissue substitutes may be derived from human tissue (autologous or allogeneic), xenographic, synthetic materials, or a composite of these materials.Burns, trauma wounds, DFUs, VLUs, pressure ulcers, postsurgical breast reconstruction, bullous diseases

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S251.

Growth in Advance Wound Care Product Revenues, 2014 to 2024

Even excluding the three traditional wound care dressing segments, the advanced wound care market is enormous — over the next ten years, it will grow at a compound annual growth rate of at least 7.7%, and is forecast to reach nearly $16 billion by 2024. This market is being driven by several inter-related factors: the increasing percentage of the aged (65years old and over) in country populations, the fact that people are living longer, obesity, the virtually epidemic rise of Type 2 diabetes, government policies intended to curb healthcare spending, and an increasingly sedentary population. The latter trend is seen especially in developed countries, but is also on the rise in less-developed countries as their economic standing improves and the middle class grows in numbers.

Certain product segments are forecast to have stronger growth than others. Sales of bioengineered skin & skin substitutes for wound care will increase at a CAGR of at least 15%, while sales of foam and hydrocolloid dressings will be growing at high single-digit rates, respectively.

Advance Wound Care Product Revenues, 2014 to 2024

Wound 2014 and 2024

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S251.

Wound healing factors; Growth in peripheral stenting; Nanomed applications

From our weekly email to blog subscribers…

Extrinsic Factors Affecting Wound Healing

From Report #S251, “Worldwide Wound Management, Forecast to 2024: Established and Emerging Products, Technologies and Markets in the Americas, Europe, Asia/Pacific and Rest of World.”

Extrinsic factors affecting wound healing include:

Mechanical stress
Debris
Temperature
Desiccation and maceration
Infection
Chemical stress
Medications
Other factors

Mechanical stress factors include pressure, shear, and friction. Pressure can result from immobility, such as experienced by a bed- or chair-bound patient, or local pressures generated by a cast or poorly fitting shoe on a diabetic foot. When pressure is applied to an area for sufficient time and duration, blood flow to the area is compromised and healing cannot take place. Shear forces may occlude blood vessels, and disrupt or damage granulation tissue. Friction wears away newly formed epithelium or granulation tissue and may return the wound to the inflammatory phase.

Debris, such as necrotic tissue or foreign material, must be removed from the wound site in order to allow the wound to progress from the inflammatory stage to the proliferative stage of healing. Necrotic debris includes eschar and slough. The removal of necrotic tissue is called debridement and may be accomplished by mechanical, chemical, autolytic, or surgical means. Foreign material may include sutures, dressing residues, fibers shed by dressings, and foreign material which were introduced during the wounding process, such as dirt or glass.

Temperature controls the rate of chemical and enzymatic processes occurring within the wound and the metabolism of cells and tissue engaged in the repair process. Frequent dressing changes or wound cleansing with room temperature solutions may reduce wound temperature, often requiring several hours for recovery to physiological levels. Thus, wound dressings that promote a “cooling” effect, while they may help to decrease pain, may not support wound repair.

Desiccation of the wound surface removes the physiological fluids that support wound healing activity. Dry wounds are more painful, itchy, and produce scab material in an attempt to reduce fluid loss. Cell proliferation, leukocyte activity, wound contraction, and revascularization are all reduced in a dry environment. Epithelialization is drastically slowed in the presence of scab tissue that forces epithelial cells to burrow rather than freely migrate over granulation tissue. Advanced wound dressings provide protection against desiccation.

Maceration resulting from prolonged exposure to moisture may occur from incontinence, sweat accumulation, or excess exudates. Maceration can lead to enlargement of the wound, increased susceptibility to mechanical forces, and infection. Advanced wound products are designed to remove sources of moisture, manage wound exudates, and protect skin at the edges of the wound from exposure to exudates, incontinence, or perspiration.

Infection at the wound site will ensure that the healing process remains in the inflammatory phase. Pathogenic microbes in the wound compete with macrophages and fibroblasts for limited resources and may cause further necrosis in the wound bed. Serious wound infection can lead to sepsis and death. While all ulcers are considered contaminated, the diagnosis of infection is made when the wound culture demonstrates bacterial counts in excess of 105 microorganisms per gram of tissue. The clinical signs of wound infection are erythema, heat, local swelling, and pain.

Chemical stress is often applied to the wound through the use of antiseptics and cleansing agents. Routine, prolonged use of iodine, peroxide, chlorhexidine, alcohol, and acetic acid has been shown to damage cells and tissue involved in wound repair. Their use is now primarily limited to those wounds and circumstances when infection risk is high. The use of such products is rapidly discontinued in favor of using less cytotoxic agents, such as saline and nonionic surfactants.

Medication may have significant effects on the phases of wound healing. Anti-inflammatory drugs such as steroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may reduce the inflammatory response necessary to prepare the wound bed for granulation. Chemotherapeutic agents affect the function of normal cells as well as their target tumor tissue; their effects include reduction in the inflammatory response, suppression of protein synthesis, and inhibition of cell reproduction. Immunosuppressive drugs reduce WBC counts, reducing inflammatory activities and increasing the risk of wound infection.

Other extrinsic factors that may affect wound healing include alcohol abuse, smoking, and radiation therapy. Alcohol abuse and smoking interfere with body’s defense system, and side effects from radiation treatments include specific disruptions to the immune system, including suppression of leukocyte production that increases the risk of infection in ulcers. Radiation for treatment of cancer causes secondary complications to the skin and underlying tissue. Early signs of radiation side effects include acute inflammation, exudation, and scabbing. Later signs, which may appear four to six months after radiation, include woody, fibrous, and edematous skin. Advanced radiated skin appearances can include avascular tissue and ulcerations in the circumscribed area of the original radiation. The radiated wound may not become evident until as long as 10-20 years after the end of therapy.

Source: “Wound Management to 2024”, Report #S251.


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Source: “Global Market Opportunities in Peripheral Arterial and Venous Stents, Forecast to 2020”, Report #V201.


Selected Therapeutic and Diagnostic Applications of Nanotechnology in Medicine

Below are selected applications for neuromedical technologies in development or on the market currently.

Drug Delivery
Chemotherapy drug delivery
Magnetic nanoparticles attached to cancer cells
Nanoparticles carrying drugs to arterial wall plaques
Therapeutic magnetic carriers (TMMC) [guided using magnetic resonance navigation, or MRN]

Drugs and Therapies
Diabetes
Combatting antimicrobial resistance
Alzheimer’s Disease
Infectious Disease
Arthritis

Tissue, cell and genetic engineering involving nanomedical tools
Nanomedical tools in gene therapy for inherited diseases
Artificial kidney
ACL replacements
Ophthalmology
Implanted nanodevices for alleviation of pain

Biomaterials 

Nanomedicine and Personalized Treatments

Source: Report #T650, “Global Nanomedical Technologies, Markets and Opportunities, 2016-2021”. Report #T650.

Surgical Procedures with Potential for Sealants, Glues, Hemostats

See the published report #S290, “Worldwide Markets for Medical and Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Hemostats, 2015-2022: Established and Emerging Products, Technologies and Markets in the Americas, Europe, Asia/Pacific and Rest of World”.

Sealants, glues, and hemostats must offer benefit to be adopted in clinical practice, or surgical procedures. Benefits can fall into a number of categories. These range from preventing serious complications from surgery (blood loss), improved patient outcomes (fewer complications, reduction in repeats), reductions in procedure time or other time- or cost-saving benefits, or improved aesthetic and perceived benefits. See these detailed below.

Criteria for Adjunctive Use of Hemostats, Sealants, Glues and Adhesion Prevention Products in Surgery

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Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report#S192.

We have assessed surgical sealants, glues, and hemostats for their potential in general surgery, aesthetics, neurology, urological, gastroenterology, orthopedics, and cardiovascular medicine.

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Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S192, “Worldwide Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Wound Closure Markets, 2013-2018”.


See the published report #S290, “Worldwide Markets for Medical and Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Hemostats, 2015-2022: Established and Emerging Products, Technologies and Markets in the Americas, Europe, Asia/Pacific and Rest of World”.

Wound management regional growth (“rest of north america”)

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From Report S251 (see global analysis and the above detail for Americas (with detail for U.S., Rest of North America and Latin America), Europe (United Kingdom, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, and Rest of Europe), Asia/Pacific (Japan, Korea, and Rest of Asia/Pacific) and Rest of World.

Do you wish to see excerpts from “Worldwide Wound Management, Forecast to 2024: Established and Emerging Products, Technologies and Markets”?