Global wound care market segmentation best done one country at a time

This month, MedMarket Diligence is publishing its biennial report on the global wound care market, “Worldwide Wound Management, Forecast to 2026: Established and Emerging Products, Technologies and Markets in the Americas, Europe, Asia/Pacific and Rest of World.Details.

Markets for medical technologies work according to the forces in play where products sell. There is no “global market”, per se, but an amalgamation of far-flung markets where, in one country, a new technology is embraced, and in another it’s passe or taboo or too expensive or de rigueur.

Cultural differences regarding medicine can be significant. How the sick are treated socially, how wounds are considered, the value of an innovation — may all be viewed differently through local lenses.

Differences in effective sales and distribution can exist, particularly for new technologies, in technology-importing countries.

Regulatory differences can be HUGE.  Besides the timing of FDA PMA or 510(K) versus the CE mark for the same technology, the regulatory entities are not entirely in sync regarding approval for new technologies.

On the global playing field, all active players know that some countries sre better than others at allowing foreign conpetition.

Even well established products, like traditional wound products (gauze, adherent, non-adherent), remain less well established in emerging markets.

below are the shares of each country’s total wound market represented by each technology, for non-adherent dressings, adherent dressings, gauze dressings, NPWT, and antimicrobial wound products.

The  net effect on local markets?

— Each country has greater/lesser demand for different technologies


Technology/Treatment Share of Country Total Wound Market

[For example, non-adherent wound dressings represent a little over 6% of the U.S. market, but as much as 16% of the market in China, and under 4% of the aggregate wound market in the rest of Asia/Pacific (Australia, India, etc.).]

non-adherent dressings

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report S254.

Other traditional products like adherent dressings and gauze show a pattern of lesser use in the U.S., western European countries, and Japan.

traditional adherent dressings in wound care
Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report S254.

Traditional gauze is a less significant component of the U.S. or Japan, both of which have rapidly adopted and instead use more advanced technologies.

traditional gauze dressings in wound care
Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report S254

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy, a more involved wound care technology, shows different patterns in demand across countries than other wound products.

negative pressure wound therapy wound care
Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report S254.

The actual level of risk of infection, the perceived risk of infection, and the resulting differences in adoption of antimicrobials give rise to some different adoption than one might expect.

antimicrobial wound care products
Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report S254.

Markets for advanced wound care technologies, such bioengineered skin or growth factors (not shown), illustrates a common dynamic, with the highest country use being the U.S. and whose manufacturers have often pursued the U.S. market for new technology introduction, to be followed by Europe, Asia, South America, etc. as technology migrates to less well developed markets.

Other products in wound with their own country-to-country dynamics include film dressings, foam, hydrogel, hydrocolloid, alginate, collagen, and growth factors.

See Report #S254, publishing March 2018.


Wound Management Product Growth, Up and Down, to 2016

Excerpt from MedMarket Diligence report #S245, “Worldwide Wound Management, 2007-2016.” See link for more information. Available for purchase online.

Wound Management Market Growth by Segments, 2007-2016Technologies developed and in use for the management of acute and chronic wounds have diversified from traditional dressings, bandages and wound closure techniques to include an increasing number of diverse technologies ranging from tissue engineering, growth factors, physical therapies (e.g., negative pressure) and others. Traditional dressings and bandages have evolved to contain more active elements contributing to wound healing, with products including films, hydrocolloids, foams, alginates, hydrogels, non-adherents and antimicrobials. Wound closure is a specific area of intense development and market growth beyond traditional suturing and more recent stapling technologies and has seen proliferation and high market growth for surgical sealants, glues and hemostasis products.

The size of the worldwide wound management market is ultimately driven by the clinical need for advanced wound management products. That need is most clearly reflected in the prevalence of chronic wounds and burns. Current estimates put the total annual incidence of chronic wounds at almost 9 million worldwide, and there are 177 million cases of diabetes worldwide; 10-15% of diabetic patients will develop ulcers at some point. The market for products used in the management of venous stasis (as in chronic venous ulcers) is put at over $3 billion, while the decubitus ulcer (e.g., bedsores) market is in excess of $2 billion. Sales of products used to treat diabetic foot ulcers are estimated around $1.5 billion, and the market for burns dressings is approximately $60 million.

It should be noted that a large proportion of worldwide wound product sales are accounted for by traditional types of wound management products. An estimated two-thirds of the world’s physicians are not making routine use of advanced wound management products, with availability playing only a minor role in limiting their use. Conversely, while the U.S. healthcare market is characterized by an almost overindulgent attitude toward new technologies, U.S. physicians are much more conservative in their approach to advanced wound healing technologies than their European counterparts. For this reason, the European share of the advanced wound care market is significantly higher than the U.S. share.

Market Growth in Wound Management Product Segments
Until recently, the product categories with most growth potential were alginates and foams; both have substantial shares of the total market and both are set to increase their shares substantially between 2007 and 2016. Hydrocolloids had a considerable market share in 2007 but their star is in decline; it is anticipated that they will lose several percentage points in the market share table by 2016. (Segment growth in chart from MedMarket Diligence report #S245, “Worldwide Wound Management, 2007-2016,” publishing November 2007. See link for description, table of contents.)

The most significant market entrants are growth factors and, even more dramatically, physical therapies – specifically, negative pressure (also known as VAC therapy) devices. This market sector grew from a small base to gain $1.2 billion by 2007 and is set to capture an estimated 20% of the advanced woundcare market by 2016.

Films, antimicrobials and non-adherent dressings will maintain steady growth although their shares of a vigorously expanding market will decline.

Report #S245, “Worldwide Wound Management” is available for purchase online or via Google Checkout, below.