Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (Gauze and Foam)

See the newest global wound management market report (published December 2012), Report #S249, “Wound Management, Worldwide Market and Forecast to 2020:  Established and Emerging Products, Technologies and Markets in the Americas, Europe, Asia/Pacific and Rest of World.”

In results presented in a poster session at the 24th Annual Clinical Symposium on Advances in Skin and Wound Care (San Antonio, TX), the Advanced Wound Management Division of Smith & Nephew highlighted that gauze-based negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) can achieve the same treatment goals as foam-based NPWT, which are a reduction in wound dimension, exudate, and improvement in granulation tissue.negative-pressure

Excerpt from Report #S247 on the background of NPWT:

One of the most dramatic, and perhaps surprising, recent developments in the advanced wound management sector has been the meteoric rise of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) technology, spearheaded by the V.A.C. approach developed by Kinetic Concepts Inc. (KCI). This has driven growth in the “physical treatment” market segment to exceed $1.2 billion. In 1989, Mark Chariker and Katherine Jeter developed a technique utilizing standard surgical dressings and wall suction to create a “vacuum” that aided in wound healing. In 1997, Dr. Michael Morykwas and Dr. Lewis Argenta studied the use of suction applied to polyurethane foam in wounds. Shortly after, KCI launched its product, the V.A.C.® and later received Medicare B approval. In early September 2009, Kinetic Concepts received Japanese regulatory approval to begin selling the V.A.C. device in that country. The company expects sales to commence in the first half of 2010.

Further innovations into the use of closed wound suction were made by BlueSky Medical with the Versatile One® System. Then in 2007, Smith & Nephew acquired BlueSky Medical and brought all that company’s products under the Smith & Nephew umbrella. Since the purchase of BlueSky, S&N has devoted considerable resources to contest KCI’s hold on the lion’s share of the market for NPWT devices.

More details on the study and its results from Smith & Nephew are given here. The trial was a prospective, multi-center clinical evaluation assessed 131 non-grafted patients at 21 centers in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom,  Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

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Global wound care market segmentation, drivers

Products and technologies used in advanced wound management have found varying degrees of success in global markets, stemming from differences in clinical practices, cultures, sensitivities, demographics and other geographically-driven differences.  At the macro view, the size of the advanced wound management market by countries falls in a typical pattern based on the relative size of the populations and healthcare markets:

world-wound-pie-countries

Source: MedMarket Diligence report #S247

The differences between these markets in their relative adoption and use of advanced wound management technologies is illustrated in the graph below, showing the percent of each country's total market that is represented by each wound product type.

wound-countries-and-segments

Source: MedMarket Diligence report #S247.

 

The size of the wound care market is ultimately determined by the clinical need for advanced wound management products. That need is most clearly reflected in the prevalence of chronic wounds and burns. Current estimates put the total annual incidence of chronic wounds at almost 9 million worldwide, and there are 177 million cases of diabetes worldwide; 10%–15% of diabetic patients will develop ulcers at some point. The market for products used in the management of specific wound types are, in decreasing size, venous stasis (as in chronic venous ulcers) decubitus ulcer (e.g., bedsores), diabetic foot ulcers and lastly (despite their acute nature) burn wonds.

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It should be noted that a large proportion of wound product sales are accounted for by traditional types of wound management products. It has been estimated that two-thirds of the world’s physicians are not making routine use of advanced wound management products. Perhaps surprisingly, U.S. physicians are much more conservative in their approach to advanced wound healing technologies than their European counterparts. For this reason, the European share of the AWC market is significantly higher than the U.S. share.

The implication is that there is significant market potential, if barriers such as cost and entrenched attitudes can be overcome. It is not yet widely appreciated, even in some parts of the developed world, that the relatively high initial cost of managing hard-to-heal wounds with advanced techniques is more than offset by the savings achieved with shorter treatment periods and reduction in the demand for skilled medical attention.

 

(From "Worldwide Wound Management, 2008-2017: Established and Emerging Products, Technologies and Markets in the U.S., Europe, Japan and Rest of World", report #S247.)