Six Key Trends in Sealants, Glues, Hemostats Markets to 2022

From July 2016 published Report #S290.

Here are six key trends we see in the global market for surgical sealants, glues, and hemostats:

  1. Aggressive development of products (including by universities, startups, established competitors), regulatory approvals, and new product introductions continues in the U.S., Europe, and Asia/Pacific (mostly Japan, Korea) to satisfy the growing volume of surgical procedures globally.
  2. Rapid adoption of sealants, glues, hemostats in China will drive much of the global market for these products, but other nations in the region are also big consumers, with more of the potential caseload already tapped than the rising economic China giant. Japan is a big developer and user of wound product consumer. Per capital demand is also higher in some countries like Japan.
  3. Flattening markets in the U.S. and Europe (where home-based manufacturers are looking more at emerging markets), with Europe in particular focused intently on lowering healthcare costs.
  4. The M&A, and deal-making that has taken place over the past few years (Bristol-Myers Squibb, The Medicines Company, Cohera Medical, Medafor, CR Bard, Tenaxis, Mallinckrodt, Xcede Technologies, etc.) will continue as market penetration turns to consolidation.
  5. Growing development on two fronts: (1) clinical specialty and/or application specific product formulation, and (2) all purpose products that provide faster sealing, hemostasis, or closure for general wound applications for internal and external use.
  6. Bioglues already hold the lead in global medical glue sales, and more are being developed, but there are also numerous biologically-inspired, though not -derived, glues in the starting blocks that will displace bioglue shares. Nanotech also has its tiny fingers in this pie, as well.

See Report #S290, “Worldwide Sealants, Glues, and Hemostats Markets, 2015-2022”.

Recent Merger and Acquisition Activity in Sealants, Glues and Hemostats

Growth in sealants, glues, and hemostats markets has been strong enough for long enough to have attracted a lot of players. With growth slowing as the untapped potential is reducing more rapidly, consolidation has now appeared in the natural order of things.

Recent Merger and Acquisition Activity in Sealants, Glues and Hemostats

Original Company/ ProductAcquiring or Collaborating CompanyDate of Acquisition/Collaboration DealFinancial Details (where revealed)
Bristol-Myers Squibb/ Recothrom¨ Thrombin topical hemostatThe Medicines Company2012/2014$105 million collaboration fee
Cohera Medical/TissuGlu¨Collaboration with B. Braun Surgical S.A. to distribute in Germany, Spain and Portugal.Jan. 2015B. Braun Surgical S.A. will exclusively market and sell TissuGlu in the territories of Germany, Spain and Portugal through its existing Closure Technologies commercial teams.
Profibrix/ FibroCapsThe Medicines Company2013$90 million, with $140 million contingent upon milestones
Medafor/Arista¨ AH Absorbable Hemostatic ParticlesCR Bard (Bard Davol)2013$200 million upfront payment
Tenaxis Medical, with ArterX (among other products)The Medicines Company2014$58 million in upfront payments
The Medicines Company/ PreveLeakª (formerly known as ArterX), Raplixaª(formerly known as FibroCaps) fibrin sealant, Recothrom¨ Thrombin topical (Recombinant) sealantMallinckrodt plc2016The entire deal has a potential value of $410 million.
Xcede Technologies, Inc./Resorbable Hemostatic PatchCollaboration with Cook BiotechJan-16Signed three collaboration agreements with Cook Biotech, including a Development Agreement, a License Agreement and a Supply Agreement to complete development, seek regulatory clearance and produce XcedeÕs resorbable hemostatic patch.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290.

To request a set of report excerpts, click here.

Growth in Sealants, Glues, Hemostats, and Wound Closure is Absolute, Relative

(See the 2016 published report #S290, “Sealants, Glues, Hemostats, 2016-2022”.)

Of late, I have needed to re-emphasize the difference between absolute and relative growth in medtech markets (and its importance). So, here it is again, this time regarding surgical sealants and other wound closure products.

The lowest relative rate of growth in this industry is the well-established sutures and staples segment. Sales of these products globally, even supported by innovations in bioresorbables and laparoscopic delivery technologies, are only growing at a 5.6% compound annual growth rate from 2013 to 2018. By comparison, growth of sales of surgical glues and sealants is at 9.4% for 2013-2018.

But from an absolute sales growth point of view, sales of sutures and staples will go from $5.2 billion to $6.9 billion, or absolute growth of $1.7 billion. Simultaneously, the relatively high growth in surgical glues and sealants translates to the absolute growth from 2013 to 2018 of only $0.9 billion.

Obviously, both absolute and relative growth are of interest.

Screen Shot 2015-07-23 at 2.31.03 PM

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S192.

Bioactive Agents in Wound Sealing and Closure

Excerpt from Report #S192, “Worldwide Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Wound Closure 2013-2018”.

Screen Shot 2015-03-30 at 10.14.59 AMBiologically active sealants typically contain various formulations of fibrin and/or thrombin, either of human or animal origin, which mimic or facilitate the final stages of the coagulation cascade. The most common consist of a liquid fibrin sealant product in which fibrinogen and thrombin are stored separately as a frozen liquid or lyophilized powder. Before use, both components need to be reconstituted or thawed and loaded into a two-compartment applicator device that allows mixing of the two components just prior to delivery to the wound. Because of the laborious preparation process, these products are not easy to use. However, manufacturers have been developing some new formulations designed to make the process more user friendly.

Selected Biologically Active Sealants, Glues, and Hemostats 

CompanyProduct NameDescription/(*Status)
Asahi Kasei MedicalCryoSeal FS SystemFibrin sealant system comprising an automated device and sterile blood processing disposables that enable autologous fibrin sealant to be prepared from a patient’s own blood plasma in about an hour. Approved in the US for liver resection surgery and CE marked in Europe. Also sold in Japan and other Asian countries.
BaxterArtissFibrin sealant spray
TisseelBiodegradable fibrin sealant made of human fibrinogen and human thrombin. For oozing and diffuse bleeding.
FloSealHemostatic bioresorbable sealant/glue containing human thrombin and bovine-derived, glutaraldehyde-crosslinked proprietary gelatin matrix. For moderate to severe bleeding.
GelFoam PlusHemostatic sponge comprising Pfizer’s Gelfoam hemostatic sponge, made of porcine skin and gelatin, packaged with human plasma-derived thrombin powder.
Behring/NycomedTachoComb (sold OUS only). Manufactured by NycomedFleece-type collagen hemostat coated with fibrin glue components.
Bristol-Myers Squibb/ZymoGenetics (sold by The Medicines Company in the US and Canada)RecothromFirst recombinant, plasma-free thrombin hemostat; approved in US in 2008.
CSL BehringBeriplast P/Beriplast P Combi-Set (sold OUS only)Freeze dried fibrin sealant. Comprised of human fibrinogen-factor XIII and thrombin in aprotinin and calcium chloride solution.
Haemocomplettan P, RiaSTAPFreeze-dried human fibrinogen concentrate.
Haemocomplettan is sold in US and RiaSTAP is on the market in Europe.
J&J/EthiconEvicelEvicel is a new formulation of the previously available fibrin sealant Quixil (EU)/Crosseal (US). Does not contain the antifibrinolytic agent tranexamic acid, which is potentially neurotoxic, nor does it contain synthetic or bovine aprotinin, which reduces potential for hypersensitivity reactions.
EvarrestAbsorbable fibrin sealant patch comprised of flexible matrix of oxidized, regenerated cellulose backing under a layer of polyglactin 910 non-woven fibers and coated on one side with human fibrinogen and thrombin. FDA approved December 2012.
BIOSEAL Fibrin SealantLow-cost porcine-derived surgical sealant manufactured in China by J&J company Bioseal Biotechnology and targeted to emerging markets.
EvithromHuman thrombin for topical use as hemostat. Made of pooled human blood.
Pfizer/King PharmaceuticalsThrombin JMIBovine-derived topical thrombin hemostat.
Stryker/OrthovitaVitagel SurgicalBovine collagen and thrombin hemostat.
Takeda/NycomedTachoSilAbsorbable surgical patch made of collagen sponge matrix combined with human fibrinogen and thrombin. FDA approved as adjunct to hemostasis in cardiovascular surgery. This is the latest version of TachoComb (see above).
Teijin Pharma Ltd/Teijin Group (Tokyo, Japan)KTF-374Company is working with Chemo-Sero-Therapeutic Research Institute (KAKETSUKEN) to develop a sheet-type surgical fibrin sealant. Product combines KAKETSUKEN’s recombinant thrombin and fibrinogen technology with Teijin’s high-performance fiber technology to create the world’s first recombinant fibrin sealant on a bioabsorbable, flexible, nonwoven electrospun fiber sheet.
The Medicines Company (TMC)Raplixa (formerly Fibrocaps)Sprayable dry-powder formulation of fibrinogen and thrombin to aid in hemostasis during surgery to control mild or moderate bleeding.
In development: Fibropad patchFDA accepted company’s BLA application for Fibrocaps in April 2014 and set an action date (PDUFA) of January 31, 2015. In November 2013, the European Medicines Agency agreed to review the firm’s EU marketing authorization application. Company anticipates US and European launch in early to mid-2015.
Vascular SolutionsD-Stat FlowableThick, but flowable, thrombin-based mixture to prevent bleeding in the subcutaneous pectoral pockets created during pacemaker and ICD implantations.

Note: Status of products detailed in Report #S192.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC

Wound Sealant and Securement Procedure Volumes by Clinical Area and End-Point

(See the 2016 published report #S290, “Sealants, Glues, Hemostats, 2016-2022”.)

Sealants, glues, hemostats, and other products in wound closure and securement offer benefits that vary by clinical area, but the nature of that benefit also varies by the type of end-point (benefit) the product achieves — does it provide a life-saving benefit? A time-saving? Cost-savings? A cosmetic or aesthetic benefit?

Accordingly, by examining the volume of procedures for which closure and securement products provide which kind of benefit is crucial to understanding demand, especially between competitive products.

Below is a categorization of benefits ranging from the critical (I) to the aesthetic (IV).

Criteria for Adjunctive Use of Hemostats, Sealants, Glues and Adhesion Prevention Products in Surgery

Screen Shot 2015-06-23 at 7.24.29 AM

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC (Report #S192)

Considering these different categories, below are the volumes of procedures distributed by category across each of the major clinical disciplines.

Surgical Procedures with Potential for the Use of Hemostats, Sealants, Glues and Wound Closure Products, Worldwide (Millions), 2014

 

 

 

 

Screen Shot 2015-06-23 at 7.28.36 AM

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC (Report #S192)

(See the 2016 published report #S290, “Sealants, Glues, Hemostats, 2016-2022”.)

Classification of Wounds by Morphology

Wounds may be classified according to their depth and whether underlying tissues are damaged. Partial-thickness wounds do not intrude through the dermis and can heal by regeneration; full-thickness wounds involve both the epidermis and dermis, and sometimes underlying tissues as well. They generally heal by scar formation. Wound classification by morphology is shown below:

TypeTissue CharacteristicsEtiologyPrognosis for Healing
Partial thicknessInvolves entire epidermis and portions of dermis.Friction, pressure, small cuts, minor burns.Heal within 10-18 days, epidermal element germinates and migrates up to the epithelial layer. Heals without significant scarring or functional impairment.
Deep partial thicknessInvolves entire epidermis and almost entire dermis.Friction, cuts, significant burns.Healing within 20-35 days.
Full thicknessInvolves epidermis and dermis; may extend into subcutaneous tissue. Sweat glands and hair follicles are destroyed.Severe deep cuts, surgical incisions, most chronic wounds, and third-degree burns.Heals by granulation, formation of new blood vessels, new biomaterial deposition, and new cells over many weeks. Scarring usually results.
Underlying tissue damageConsidered more extensive than full- thickness wounds. Involves subcutaneous tissue, muscle, fascia, bone, and other organs.Surgery of organs, electrical burns and certain thermal burns, such as molten metal or severe scalding, massive traumatic injury, and untreated chronic damage.May require debridement or removal of all necrotic tissue to expose viable bleeding tissue. Systemic antibiotic therapy and grafts/flap skin replacement.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC

The global wound management market is the subject of Report #S249.

The global market for surgical sealants, glues, hemostats, vascular closure devices, sutures/staples, and tapes is the subject of Report #S192.

See also the October 2015 report, “Worldwide Wound Management, Forecast to 2024:
Established and Emerging Products, Technologies and Markets
in the Americas, Europe, Asia/Pacific and Rest of World”, Report #S251.

Absolute and Relative Growth in Wound Closure Product Sales Worldwide

(See the 2016 published report #S290, “Sealants, Glues, Hemostats, 2016-2022”.)

Medtech manufacturers interested in “growth” markets need to consider the relative versus absolute. Nascent markets can growth from $1 million sales in year 1 to $2 million in year 2, obviously a 100% increase. But in multi-billion markets, a $1 million increase will elicit a yawn from all but the smallest manufacturers.

Just as an exercise, I ranked the growth rates for sales of wound closure products detailed in our Report #S192 by both the absolute sales growth from 2014 to 2018 and the compound annual growth rate over this period. To reveal the differences even further, I ranked all combinations of geographic area and wound closure product type. Partial results — just the top growth rankings, since the list is too long to show all — are shown side by side below (click on the chart to see a more legible version).

Wound Closure Sales Growth, Absolute and Relative, 2014-2018

Screen Shot 2015-05-25 at 9.40.11 AM

Source: “Worldwide Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Wound Closure Markets, 2013-2018”, Report #S192.

Even though tapes, sutures and staples have very modest growth rates in many geographic markets, their current dollar volume sales make such growth much more significant in absolute terms.

 

(See the 2016 published report #S290, “Sealants, Glues, Hemostats, 2016-2022”.)

Sealants, Glues, Hemostasis and Wound Closure Market, Size and Growth

(See the 2016 published report #S290, “Sealants, Glues, Hemostats, 2016-2022”.)

The simple practice of closing wounds is not so simple, driven as it is by the fact that wounds can be the conduit for blood, infectious agents and every other liquid, gas or solid that should not enter or exit the wound.  The closure has to be readily accomplished, regardless of where the wound exists. The closure should not only prevent blood from being lost but ideally should actively stop the bleeding. The wound must stay closed despite the pressures exerted upon it. The closure should also have a minimal “footprint”, with the closure components being easily removed, absorbed or otherwise leaving the least possible trace of the closure, including scar tissue.

Hence, tapes, staples, sutures, clips, hemostatic agents, sealants, glues and other devices have been developed to get the job done.  The market for this range of closure options now reflects biologics, absorbable materials, devices and other products. Fundamentally, the market remains largely dominated by sutures and staples/clips, which have satisfied the demands of internal/external closure, easy of use, low cost, strength of closure and other considerations, not least of which is the evolving nature of surgical practice from the “open” to endo/laparoscopic. Nonetheless, tighter wound sealing, less bleeding and better outcomes in general have driven manufacturers to develop improvements.

Below is illustrated the 2014 market for the range of wound closure products along with their associated growth rates. The prospects for medical/surgical tapes are the exception to the rule, demonstrating a steady decline while better alternatives demonstrate steady growth.

Screen Shot 2015-05-20 at 10.08.13 AM

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S192

 

(See the 2016 published report #S290, “Sealants, Glues, Hemostats, 2016-2022”.)

Sealants/Glues, Hemostats, Other Wound Closure Markets, Size and Growth

Products in wound closure include sutures/staples, tapes, vascular closure devices, surgical hemostats, and surgical sealants/glues.

Wound types have not changed over history, with a slight exception being the emergence (several decades ago) of femoral punctures associated with catheterization procedures. But what has changed, and what continues to evolve, is the practice of closing those wounds. Sutures, staples and tapes are a mainstay of medical practice, representing uncomplicated methods to secure wounds. And while innovators continue to change the form and function of these products to improve performance, the more recently introduced surgical hemostats, vascular closure, and surgical sealants/glues have seized significant shares of wound closure caseload and are growing marginally faster than sutures/staples and tapes. The result is and will be an erosion of traditional wound closure technology shares.

Below is illustrated the size/growth of segments in the global wound closure market.

Screen Shot 2015-04-13 at 7.05.33 AM
Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; “Worldwide Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Wound Closure Markets, 2013-2018”, Report #S192.

Sticky stuff: remora, mussels, geckos, crab shells, Australian burrowing frogs, spider webs, porcupine quills, sandcastle worms

It may not be obvious what links all of these creatures, but it is their all-natural adhesiveness. While we have covered these before, today Researchers at Purdue University report on the development of new glues with industrial applications (including medical) based on glues derived from, or inspired by, mussels and oysters.

The reality is that there is a very wide range of naturally occurring “bio-glues” or other adhesives (or adhesive mechanisms) that are being evaluated for their potential use as medical/surgical glues and adhesives.

(This technique of “biomimicry”, in which products are developed that exploit or replicate features in nature, is not new. Velcro, for instance, was invented in 1941 by Swiss engineer George de Mestral, who recognized a potential product in burrs, the plant seed pods covered with hooked spines that readily attach to fur, fabrics and almost any surface that has filamentous covering.)

Below is a list of organism-derived “bio-glues”, a wide range of naturally-occurring adhesives that are being investigated for their potential development as commercial adhesives, including for medical/surgical adhesion.

Most of these have at least been preliminarily investigated as to why they have such high strength, why they adhere under certain challenging conditions and other considerations. Further research and development, in some cases to an advanced degree, has been done on a number of these to actually either directly utilize these glues, modify them or develop new ones inspired by them.

MedMarket Diligence tracks the medical/surgical markets for fibrin and other sealants, glues, hemostats, tapes, vascular closure devices, and staples/sutures/clips in Report #S192. Products specifically related to closure of wounds (excluding hemostasis*) will exceed $11 billion in sales by 2018:

Screen Shot 2015-04-03 at 8.08.01 AM

*Hemostasis is covered in report #S192.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S192.