Medtech Startups, 2010-2015

From 2010 to present (Oct 2015), as included in the Medtech Startups Database, MedMarket Diligence identified 442 new (under one year old) medical technology startups whose businesses encompass, alone or in combination, medical devices, diagnostics, biomaterials, and the subset of both biotech and pharma that is in direct competition with medical devices, including tissue engineering and cell therapy. Of these, 74% were founded in the U.S., 5% were founded in Israel, and the rest were founded in 18 other countries.

Companies in the database have been categorized by clinical and/or technology area of focus, with multiple categories possible (e.g., minimally invasive and orthomusculoskeletal and surgery). Below is the composition of the companies identified from Jan. 2010 to Oct. 2015.

Screen Shot 2015-10-06 at 4.50.10 PM

Source: Medtech Startups Database

Below is a graphic on the companies by country. The U.S. (not shown) led with 327 companies.

Screen Shot 2015-10-06 at 4.17.30 PM

Source: Medtech Startups Database

In the U.S., the breakdown by state, other than California and its 466 companies (excluded only to show states with significantly lower numbers), is as follows:

Screen Shot 2015-10-06 at 5.13.08 PM

Source: Medtech Startups Database

 

Tissue Engineering and Cell Therapy Market Outlook

The market for tissue engineering and cell therapy products is set to grow to nearly $32 billion by 2018. This figure includes bioengineered products that are themselves cells or are actively stimulating cell growth or regeneration, products that often represent a combination of biotechnology, medical device and pharmaceutical technologies. The largest segment in the overall market for regenerative medicine technologies and products comprises orthopedic applications. Other key sectors are cardiac and vascular disease, neurological diseases, diabetes, inflammatory diseases and dental decay and injury.

An overview (map) of the spectrum of clinical applications in tissue engineering and cell therapy is shown below:

Source: Report #S520

Cell therapy is defined as a process whereby new cells are introduced into tissue as a method of treating disease; the process may or may not include gene therapy. Forms of cell therapy can include: transplantation of autologous (from the patient) or allogeneic (from a donor) stem cells , transplantation of mature, functional cells, application of modified human cells used to produce a needed substance, xenotransplantation of non-human cells used to produce a needed substance, and transplantation of transdifferentiated cells derived from the patient’s differentiated cells.

Once considered a segment of biomaterial technologies, tissue engineering has evolved into its own category and now comprises a combination of cells, engineering and suitable biochemical and physiochemical factors to improve or replace biological functions. These include ways to repair or replace human tissue with applications in nearly every medical specialty. Regenerative medicine is often synonymous with tissue engineering but usually focuses on the use of stem cells.

Tissue engineering and cell therapy may be considered comprised of bioengineered products that are themselves cells or are actively stimulating cell growth or regeneration. These often comprise a combination of biotechnology, medical device and pharmaceutical technologies.

Researchers have been examining tissue engineering and cell therapy for roughly 30 years. While some products in some specialties (such as wound care) have reached market, many others are still in research and development stages. In recent years, large pharmaceutical and medical device companies have provided funding for smaller biotech companies in the hopes that some of these products and therapies will achieve a highly profitable, commercial status. In addition, some companies have been acquired by larger medical device and pharmaceutical companies looking to bring these technologies under their corporate umbrellas. Many of the remaining smaller companies received millions of privately funded dollars per year in research and development. In many cases it takes at least ten years to bring a product to the point where human clinical trials may be conducted. Because of the large amounts of capital to achieve this, several companies have presented promising technologies only to close their doors and/or sell the technology to a larger company due to lack of funds.

The goal of stem cell research is to develop therapies to treat human disease through methods other than medication. Key aspects of this research are to examine basic mechanisms of the cell cycle (including the expression of genes during the formation of embryos) as well as specialization and differentiation into human tissue, how and when the differentiation takes place and how differentiated cells may be coaxed to differentiate into a specific type of cell. In the differentiation process, stem cells are signaled to become a specific, specialized type of cell when internal signals controlled by a cell’s genes are interspersed across long strands of DNA and carry coded instructions for all the structures and functions of a cell. In addition, cell differentiation may be caused externally by use of chemicals secreted by other cells, physical contact with neighboring cells and certain molecules in the microenvironment.

The end goal of stem cell research is to develop therapies that will allow the repair or reversal of diseases that previously were largely untreatable or incurable.. These therapies include treatment of neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, repair or replacement of damaged organs such as the heart or liver, the growth of implants from autologous cells, and even regeneration of lost digits or limbs.

In a developing human embryo, a specific layer of cells normally become precursor cells to cells found only in the central nervous system or the digestive system or the skin, depending on the cell layer and the elements of the embryo that direct cell differentiation. Once differentiated, many of these cells can only become one kind of cell. However, researchers have discovered that adult body cells exist that are either stem cells or can be coaxed to become stem cells that have the ability to become virtually any type of human cell, thus paving the way to engineer adult stem cell that can bring about repair or regeneration of tissues or the reversal of previously incurable diseases.

Another unique characteristic of stem cells is that they are capable of self-division and self-renewal over long periods of time. Unlike muscle, blood or nerve cells, stem cells can proliferate many times. When exposed to ideal conditions in the laboratory, a relatively small sample of stem cells can eventually yield millions of cells.

There are five primary types of stem cells: totipotent early embryonic cells (which can differentiate into any kind of human cell); pluripotent blastocyst embryonic stem cells, which are found in an embryo seven days after fertilization and can become almost any kind of cell in the body; fetal stem cells, which appear after the eighth week of development; multipotent umbilical cord stem cells, which can only differentiate into a limited number of cell types; and unspecialized adult stem cells, which exist in already developed tissue (commonly nerves, blood, skin, bone and muscle) of any person after birth.

tissue-cell-2012-2018

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S520, “Tissue Engineering & Cell Therapy Worldwide 2009-2018.”

Developmental Timescales

Tissue engineering and cellular therapy products take years of research and many millions of dollars (averaging about $300 million, according to some reports) before they make it over the hurdles of clinical trials and into actual market launch. More than one small biotech company has burned through its money too quickly and been unable to attract enough investment to keep the doors open. The large pharmaceutical and medical device companies are watching development carefully, and have frequently made deals or entered into alliances with the biotechs, but they have learned to be cautious about footing the bill for development of a product that, in the end, may never sell.

For many of the products in development, product launch is likely to occur within five years. Exceptions include skin and certain bone and cartilage products, which are already on the market. Other products are likely to appear on the European market before launch in the United States, due to the presence of (so far) less stringent product review and approval laws in the European Union.

Even when the products are launched, take-up will be far from 100% of all patients with that particular condition. Initially, tissue engineering and cell therapy products will go to patients suffering from cancers and other life-threatening conditions, who, for example, are unable to wait any longer for a donor organ. Patients who seem to be near the end of their natural lives likely will not receive these treatments. Insurance coverage will certainly play a key role as well in the decision about who receives which treatments and when. But most importantly, physicians will be selecting who among their patients will be treated; the physicians learn about the treatments by using them, by observing the patient’s reactions, and by discussing their experiences with colleagues. In other words, the application of tissue engineering and cellular therapy will progress in a manner similar to the introduction of any new technology: through generally conservative usage by skilled, highly trained physicians dedicated to providing their patients with the best possible treatment without causing them additional harm.

 

Posted via email from medmarket’s posterous

Reference reports in Ophthalmology, Coronary Stents and Tissue Engineering

MedMarket Diligence has added three previously published, comprehensive analyses of  medtech markets to its Reference Reports listings. The markets covered in the three reports are:

  • Ophthalmology Diagnostics, Devices and Drugs (see link)
  • Coronary Stents: Drug-Eluting, Bare, Bioresorbable and Others (see link)
  • Tissue Engineering, Cell Therapy and Transplantation (see link)

Termed “Reference Reports”, these detailed studies were initially completed typically within the past five years. They now serve as exceptional references to those markets, since fundamental data about each of these markets has remained largely unchanged. Such data includes:

  • Disease prevalence, incidence and trends (including credible forecasts to the present)
  • Clinical practices and trends in the management of the disease(s)
  • Industry structure including competitors (most still active today)
  • Detailed appendices on procedure data, company directories, etc.

Arguably, a least one quarter of every NEW medtech report contains background data encompassing the data listed above.  Therefore, the MedMarket Diligence reports have been priced in the single user editions at $950 each, which is roughly one quarter the price of a full report.

See links above for detailed report descriptions, tables of contents, lists of exhibits and ordering. If you have further questions, feel free to contact Patrick Driscoll at (949) 859-3401 or (toll free US) 1-866-820-1357.

See the comprehensive list of MedMarket Diligence reports at link.

 

Growth in Spine Surgery, By Technology and Country

Given that there are two major parameters (among many) for differences in spine surgery growth rates — growth by specific technology and growth by specific country — it is worthwhile to examine all of the possible country-technology combinations in spine surgery (at least those combinations covered in our global spine surgery report).

Below is illustrated graphically a ranking in descending order of the country-segment growth rates (compound annual growth rates from 2011 to 2020) for spine surgery technologies.

Technology-Country Growth Rates (CAGR 2011-2020) in Global Spine Surgery

Source: “Worldwide Spine Surgery:  Products, Technologies, Markets and Opportunities, 2010-2020”, Report #M520.

Omitted from this graphic are technologies such as Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion (in most countries), which is expected to have significant growth during this forecast period, but has very low revenue thus far and would therefore display growth rates off the chart for the time period.

The growing need for diabetes management globally

Population growth, trends in obesity prevalence, economic drivers and other forces are creating an enormous need for products in the management of diabetes.  In the aggregate, over the next twenty years, the prevalence of diabetes in the adult population (age 20-79) will increase from 285 million worldwide in 2010 to 438 million in 2030, an overall increase of 54%.

NAC: North America and Caribbean region; MENA: Middle East and North Africa region; SEA: South East Asia region; EUR: European region; SACA: South and Central America region; WP: Western Pacific region; AFR: Africa region.

Source: IDF Diabetes Atlas and MedMarket Diligence, LLC.

 

The greatest number of newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients are arising in South East Asia (SEA), Western Pacific (WP) and Middle East and North Africa (MENA), as illustrated below (figures in millions):

Source: IDF Diabetes Atlas and MedMarket Diligence, LLC.

 

Growth of the diabetes patient population in North America and Europe, with its well developed economies and healthcare system infrastructure, is occurring at a compound annual growth rate, from 2010 to 2030, of 1.8% in North America and 0.9% in Europe. These new patients will be readily integrated into the existing infrastructure of clinical management.  By contrast, however, the large numbers of patients arising from South East Asia, the Western Pacific and the Middle East and North Africa will demand development of infrastructure to manage these patients and supply the appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic products for management of their diabetes mellitus.


Data is drawn from the International Diabetes Federation and MedMarket Diligence Report #D510, "Worldwide Diabetes Management."

Brief: technologies under development at medtech startups

New technologies under development at medical technology startups.

Below are the technologies under development at  medical technology startups recently identified and included in the MedMarket Diligence Medtech Startups Database:

  • Medical device incubator company
  • Developing minimally invasive therapies for end stage renal disease.
  • Electrical stimulation technology to restore temporary continence control for patients with colostomies.
  • Sonolysis for treatment of vascular thromobus disorders.
  • Undisclosed nanotech medical product development.
  • Medical robotics
  • Undisclosed medical technology
  • Tissue welding via cold plasma and albumin.
  • Intravascular medical device coatings containing resveratrol and quercetin.
  • Collagen-based implants for soft tissue defects.
  • Drug-device combinations in cardiovascular, renal and GI
  • Endometrial ablation for treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding.
  • Wound healing technology based on choroid plexus proteins.
  • Osteobiologics
  • Creating natural bionanomatrix coating technologies for medical devices and clinical problems in cardiovascular disease.
  • Needleless vascular access for dialysis
  • Stem cell coatings for medical devices and implants.
  • Neuromodulation for urinary incontinence.
  • Motion preservation and percutaneous technologies in spine surgery.
  • New platform technology for vials, syringes, autoinjectors and other drug delivery devices.
  • Dissolution of arterial plaques via elevation of bile salts.

Predominantly, these are U.S.-based companies, but they also include companies in Israel, Germany and the United Kingdom.