Abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysm repair: procedures forecast

Below is an excerpt from, “Global Dynamics of Surgical and Interventional Cardiovascular Procedures, 2015-2022,” (Report #C500 described, available online).

Selection of specific management protocols for patients with aortic aneurysms depends on the disease morphology as well as patient’s age, overall health status, and comorbidities involved. In cases involving smaller and relatively stable abdominal or thoracic aortic aneurysm (AAA or TAA), watchful waiting represents a commonly preferred approach. Radical surgical or endovascular interventions are generally reserved for cases when the diameter of the aneurismal sac is larger than 5cm to 5.5cm, or the annual expansion rate exceeds 1.0 cm, or when the aneurysm becomes symptomatic.

Surgical Repair of Aortic Aneurysms

Prior to the advent of AAA/TAA endovascular repair tools and techniques, a highly invasive and risky surgical repair procedure constituted the only curative option for patients with advanced and rupture prone aortic aneurysm. Conducted under the general anesthesia the procedure takes a few hours and entails a major and highly traumatic operation with a 10-15 inch cut in abdominal wall, clamping and isolation of aneurysmic segment of aorta, incision into the aneurysm, evacuation of the clot contained within, placement of a synthetic graft, and wrapping of the graft with remnants of the aortic wall.

The typical surgical aneurysm repair is associated with a substantial (5% to 8%) mortality rate and serious complications, such as stroke, myocardial infarction, renal failure etc.

Due to the close proximity to the heart, the risk and complication rates of surgical intervention for aneurysm repair on the thoracic aorta increase multifold resulting in an average procedural mortality rate of up to 30 percent.

The high cost of the procedure is largely the result of extended ICU and hospital stays, which can last upwards of a week (but average roughly 10-12 days). Further, postoperative recovery may require up to six additional weeks subsequent to discharge, making temporary disability a major consideration for many patients.

Notwithstanding these drawbacks, open surgical aortic aneurysm repair is still commonly regarded as highly effective treatment modality that virtually eliminates the risk of aneurismal sac rupture and does not require extensive postoperative follow-up exams or revisions.

However, because of high prevalence of elderly and health-impaired persons in diagnosed aortic aneurysm caseloads and traumatic nature of AAA/TAA surgery, only a fraction of the patients who could benefit from surgical aneurysm repair is deemed eligible for such a procedure.

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with Endovascular Stent-Grafts

During the past two decades, advances in interventional technologies paved the way for the advent of a considerably less invasive and risky endovascular AAA repair procedure. The procedure involves a transcatheter deployment of the specially designed endovascular prosthesis (typically combining sealing functions of the vascular graft and full or partial stenting support structure) into a defective segment of aorta with the goal of excluding the aneurysmal sac from blood circulation.

The endovascular stent-grafts (SGs) – which come both in self-expanding or balloon-expandable versions – are typically anchored to an undamaged part of the aorta both above and below the aneurysm via a compression fit or/and with a special fixation mechanism like hooks, barbs, etc.

To accommodate a great morphological diversity of aortic aneurysms the vast majority of endovascular SGs is employing a modular design concept providing the aorto iliac, bifurcated and straight tubular device configurations to cover a variety of AAA indications. Several SG systems also feature an open stenting structure at proximal end to enable suprarenal device deployment required in about 30% to 35% of all AAA cases warranting intervention.

In its idea, the endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm was intended to produce clinical outcomes comparable to these yielded by the open surgery, while reducing the associated trauma, recovery time, morbidity and the overall treatment cost. It was also generally expected that availability of less-invasive endovascular treatment option would allow to extend caseloads coverage to sizable rupture-prone AAA patient subsets who are poor surgical candidates.

Limitations of Endovascular AAA Repair

Findings from numerous clinical studies and real-life experience in the field seem to indicate that endovascular aortic aneurysm repair via stent-graft placement tends to provide immediate procedural outcomes comparable to these obtainable with open surgery. Furthermore, the typical ICU and hospital stay for endovascular AAA repair averages 2 days (though it may last twice longer for patients with significant comorbidities). All of these translates into reduced inpatient costs of AAA repair relative to open surgery, although the high price of stent-grafting devices largely offsets these cost savings. Post-discharge recovery is also shortened from weeks or months to an average 7-10-day period.

Unfortunately, comparative long-term clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the endovascular approach to aortic aneurysm repair appears to be problematic due to unavoidable shortcomings of available aortic stent-graft designs and complications associated with their less than perfect performance in situ.

The major problems associated with the endovascular AAA repair approach include relatively high incidence of endoleaks (up to 15%), endotension, and device failure, which multiply the risk of catastrophic aneurysm rupture and necessitate costly revisions (in up to 35% of the cases) as well as long-term (or life-long) patient surveillance (with mandatory imaging exams). Due to that, the actual overall cost of endovascular repair in many considerably exceeds expenses incurred in traditional open surgery.

Another limitation of endovascular stent-grafting relates to its ability to accommodate complex aortic aneurysm morphology and branch involvement. Based on some end-user and industry reporting, only about 50% of patients that develop intervention-warranting AAAs are considered good candidates for endovascular repair with currently available product configurations.

According to some recent reporting, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) treatment with certain stent grafts also appears to be associated with higher late mortality rates (due to aneurysm rupture) compared to surgical AAA repair. Based on available long-term follow-up data, mortality in AAA patients retrofitted with the market-leading SG averages 1.3% and 1.5% at four and five years compared to 0.7% and 0.9% for AAA surgery.

Endovascular Repair of TAA

Introduced in Europe and the U.S. in 1998 and 2005, accordingly, endovascular techniques for aneurysm (and aortic dissection) repair on thoracic aorta represented a logical extension of the very same basic concept and technology platforms that enabled the development of AAA stent-grafts.

Because of extremely high mortality and morbidity rates associated with TAA surgery, the need for minimally invasive endovascular treatment option was even more compelling than that in AAA case.

Similar to AAA endovascular repair devices, TAA stent-grafts are intended to minimize the risk of catastrophic thoracic aortic aneurysm rupture via effective exclusion (isolation) of the aneurismal sac from blood circulation.

Unlike AAA implants, commercially available TAA stent-grafting devices feature relatively simple tubular unibody architecture with sealing cuffs (or flanges) at proximal and distal end.

Insertion of TAA SGs is done under fluoroscopic guidance via a singular femoral puncture with the use of standard transcatheter techniques. Depending on the aneurysm morphology, one or two overlapping devices might be used to ensure proper aneurismal sac isolation.

The average ICU and hospital stays and post-discharge recovery period for endovascular TAA repair procedure are generally similar to these for AAA stent-grafting intervention.

Although practical clinical experience with endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm remains somewhat limited, findings from European and U.S. clinical studies with TAA stent-grafting tend to be very encouraging. Based on these findings, stent-grafting of rupture-prone aneurysm on ascending thoracic aorta can be performed with close to perfect technical success rate yielding radical reduction in intraoperative mortality and complications compared to TAA surgery as well as impressive improvement in long-term patient survival.

Similar to AAA endografting, the main problems associated with the use of TAA SG systems include significant incidence of endoleaks and occasional device migration which require reintervention.

Aortic Aneurysm Repair Procedure Volumes

Based on the industry reporting, national and international healthcare authority data, and MedMarket Diligence estimates, in 2015, approximately 915 thousand patients worldwide were diagnosed with rupture-prone abdominal or thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections warranting radical intervention, of which roughly 359.5 thousand (or about 39.3%) were actually referred for surgical or transcatheter treatment. Covered APAC market geography (with combined population of about 2,63 billion) accounted for the largest 37.6% share of all aortic aneurysm repairs performed, followed by the U.S. with 25.6%, largest Western European states with 21.3% and the rest-of-the-world with the remaining 15.5%.

Endovascular stent-grafting techniques were utilized in approximately 162.5 thousand aortic aneurysm repair procedures in 2015, which included an estimated 133 thousand AAA-related and about 29.5 thousand TAA-related interventions (including these targeting selected thoracic aortic dissections).

The cited figures reflected a disparity both in the relative volumes of treated AAA and TAA patients and, especially, in the share of these managed with the less invasive EVAR techniques. The latter indicator was the highest for the U.S. (~75%), compared to 52% for Western Europe, 39% for APAC and only 36.6% for the ROW market geography.

During the forecast period covered in the report, the total global volume of endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs is projected to grow 5.7% per annum to approximately 243 thousand procedures, combining a 5.5% annual expansion in AAA-related interventions with a 6.6% average annual increase in TAA (aortic dissection)-related interventions.

Projected healthy gains in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair procedures should reflect continuous penetration of non-surgical (no option) AAA and TAA patient caseloads, coupled with significant incursion into surgery-eligible patient subsets both in AAA, TAA, and aortic dissection indications. Increasing reliance on utilization of less traumatic AAA and TAA stent-grafting techniques will be expedited by ongoing qualitative improvements in the endograft and delivery tools design that keep yielding more reliable, durable, versatile, and end-user friendly systems with reduced propensity to mechanical and functional failure (device kinking, fracture, endoleaks, migration, etc.) and associated clinical complications.

The largest relative gains in AAA and TAA EVAR procedures (10.9% and 11.8%, accordingly) can be expected in covered APAC territories (mostly China and India) and grossly underserved ROW zone (6.5% and 7.5%). Largely mature U.S., Western European (and Japanese) markets are likely to register a low single digit advances in utilization of endovascular AAA/TAA repair techniques.

The global procedure volume forecast for aortic aneurysm repair is presented below.

Projected Dynamics of Aortic Aneurysm Repair Procedures,
World Total, 2015-2022 (#000)

Indications / Procedures20152016201720182019202020212022CAGR 2016-2022
Total EVAR AAA/TAA Procedures1516.317.618.920.221.522.824.16.70%
Diagnosed AAA & TAA Caseloads1651701751801851901952002.80%
Treated AAA & TAA Patients5658.56163.56668.57173.53.90%
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Repair
Treated AAA Patient Caseloads45474951535557593.90%
Surgical Repair Procedures33343536373839402.80%
Endovascular Repair Procedures12131415161718196.50%
Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm (TAA) Repair
Treated TAA Patient Caseloads1111.51212.51313.51414.53.90%
Surgical Repair Procedures88.28.48.68.899.29.42.30%
Endovascular Repair Procedures33.33.63.94.24.54.85.17.50%
Total Surgical AAA/TAA Repairs4142.243.444.645.84748.249.42.70%

Notes: AAA = abdominal; aortic aneurysm. EVAR = endovascular aneurysm repair. TAA = thoracic aortic aneurysm.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #C500. (Full cardiovascular procedures report online.)

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #C500. (Full cardiovascular procedures report online.)

 

Cardiovascular procedure volume growth (interventional and surgical)

Cardiovascular surgical and interventional procedures are performed to treat conditions causing inadequate blood flow and supply of oxygen and nutrients to organs and tissues of the body. These conditions include the obstruction or deformation of arterial and venous pathways, distortion in the electrical conducting and pacing activity of the heart, and impaired pumping function of the heart muscle, or some combination of circulatory, cardiac rhythm, and myocardial disorders. Specifically, these procedures are:

  • Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery;
  • Coronary angioplasty and stenting;
  • Lower extremity arterial bypass surgery;
  • Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) with and without bare metal and drug-eluting stenting;
  • Peripheral drug-coated balloon angioplasty;
  • Peripheral atherectomy;
  • Surgical and endovascular aortic aneurysm repair;
  • Vena cava filter placement
  • Endovenous ablation;
  • Mechanical venous thrombectomy;
  • Venous angioplasty and stenting;
  • Carotid endarterectomy;
  • Carotid artery stenting;
  • Cerebral thrombectomy;
  • Cerebral aneurysm and AVM surgical clipping;
  • Cerebral aneurysm and AVM coiling & flow diversion;
  • Left Atrial Appendage closure;
  • Heart valve repair and replacement surgery;
  • Transcatheter valve repair and replacement;
  • Congenital heart defect repair;
  • Percutaneous and surgical placement of temporary and permanent mechanical cardiac support devices;
  • Pacemaker implantation;
  • Implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement;
  • Cardiac resynchronization therapy device placement;
  • Standard SVT & VT ablation; and
  • Transcatheter AFib ablation

For 2016 to 2022, the total worldwide volume of these cardiovascular procedures is forecast to expand on average by 3.7% per year to over 18.73 million corresponding surgeries and transcatheter interventions in the year 2022. The largest absolute gains can be expected in peripheral arterial interventions (thanks to explosive expansion in utilization of drug-coated balloons in all market geographies), followed by coronary revascularization (supported by continued strong growth in Chinese and Indian PCI utilization) and endovascular venous interventions (driven by grossly underserved patient caseloads within the same Chinese and Indian market geography).

Venous indications are also expected to register the fastest (5.1%) relative procedural growth, followed by peripheral revascularization (with 4.0% average annual advances) and aortic aneurysm repair (projected to show a 3.6% average annual expansion).

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; “Global Dynamics of Surgical and Interventional Cardiovascular Procedures, 2015-2022,” (Report #C500).

Geographically, Asian-Pacific (APAC) market geography accounts for slightly larger share of the global CVD procedure volume than the U.S. (29.5% vs 29,3% of the total), followed by the largest Western European states (with 23.9%) and ROW geographies (with 17.3%). Because of the faster growth in all covered categories of CVD procedures, the share of APAC can be expected to increase to 33.5% of the total by the year 2022, mostly at the expense of the U.S. and Western Europe.

However, in relative per capita terms, covered APAC territories (e.g., China and India) are continuing to lag far behind developed Western states in utilization rates of therapeutic CVD interventions with roughly 1.57 procedures per million of population performed in 2015 for APAC region versus about 13.4 and 12.3 CVD interventions done per million of population in the U.S. and largest Western European countries.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; “Global Dynamics of Surgical and Interventional Cardiovascular Procedures, 2015-2022,” (Report #C500).


Global Cardiovascular Procedures report #C500 details the current and projected surgical and interventional therapeutic procedures commonly used in the management of acute and chronic conditions affecting myocardium and vascular system.

Interventional and Surgical Cardiovascular Procedure Volumes

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a variety of acute and chronic medical conditions associated with an inability of the cardiovascular system to sustain an adequate blood flow and supply of oxygen and nutrients to organs and tissues of the body. The CVD conditions may be manifested by the obstruction or deformation of arterial and venous pathways, distortion in the electrical conducting and pacing activity of the heart, and impaired pumping function of the heart muscle, or some combination of circulatory, cardiac rhythm, and myocardial disorders.

These diseases are treated via the following surgical and interventional procedures:

  • Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery;
  • Coronary angioplasty and stenting;
  • Lower extremity arterial bypass surgery;
  • Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) with and without bare metal and drug-eluting stenting;
  • Peripheral drug-coated balloon angioplasty;
  • Peripheral atherectomy;
  • Surgical and endovascular aortic aneurysm repair;
  • Vena cava filter placement
  • Endovenous ablation;
  • Mechanical venous thrombectomy;
  • Venous angioplasty and stenting;
  • Carotid endarterectomy;
  • Carotid artery stenting;
  • Cerebral thrombectomy;
  • Cerebral aneurysm and AVM surgical clipping;
  • Cerebral aneurysm and AVM coiling & flow diversion;
  • Left Atrial Appendage closure;
  • Heart valve repair and replacement surgery;
  • Transcatheter valve repair and replacement;
  • Congenital heart defect repair;
  • Percutaneous and surgical placement of temporary and permanent mechanical cardiac support devices;
  • Pacemaker implantation;
  • Implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement;
  • Cardiac resynchronization therapy device placement;
  • Standard SVT & VT ablation; and
  • Transcatheter AFib ablation

In 2016, the cumulative worldwide volume of these procedures is projected to approach 15.05 million surgical and transcatheter interventions. This will include:

  • roughly 4.73 million coronary revascularization procedures via CABG and PCI (or about 31.4% of the total),
  • close to 4 million percutaneous and surgical peripheral artery revascularization procedures (or 26.5% of the total);
  • about 2.12 million cardiac rhythm management procedures via implantable pulse generator placement and arrhythmia ablation (or 14.1% of the total);
  • over 1.65 million CVI, DVT, and PE targeting venous interventions (representing 11.0% of the total);
  • more than 992 thousand surgical and transcatheter heart defect repairs and valvular interventions (or 6.6% of the total);
  • close to 931 thousand acute stroke prophylaxis and treatment procedures (contributing 6.2% of the total);
  • over 374 thousand abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascular and surgical repairs (or 2.5% of the total); and
  • almost 254 thousand placements of temporary and permanent mechanical cardiac support devices in bridge to recovery, bridge to transplant, and destination therapy indications (accounting for about 1.7% of total procedure volume).

Below is illustrated the overall global growth for each of the major categories of procedures through 2022.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #C500.  (Full report available online.)

There is considerable variation in the growth of cardiovascular procedures globally, but most growth is coming out of Asia/Pacific. For example, within the area of venous interventions, the growth in the use of endovenous ablation for chronic venous insufficiency is markedly higher in Asia/Pacific than in other regions, though the U.S. will remain the largest volume of these procedures.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #C500.  (Full report available online.)


“Global Dynamics of Surgical and Interventional Cardiovascular Procedures, 2015-2022” (Report #C500), published August 2016. See description, table of contents, list of exhibits at link. Available for purchase and download from link.

Peripheral Stenting Procedures and Markets

First introduced about two decades ago as a bailout technique for suboptimal or failed iliac angioplasty, peripheral vascular stenting gradually emerged as a valuable and versatile tool for a variety of primary and adjuvant applications outside the domain of coronary and cerebral vasculature.  Today, peripheral vascular stenting techniques are commonly employed in the management of the most prevalent occlusive circulatory disorders and other pathologies affecting the abdominal and thoracic aortic tree and lower extremity arterial bed. Stents are also increasingly used in the management of the debilitating conditions like venous outflow obstruction associated with deep venous thrombosis and chronic venous insufficiency.

Notwithstanding a relative maturity of the core technology platforms and somewhat problematic opportunities for conversion to value-adding peripheral drug-eluting systems, peripheral vascular stenting appears to have a significant room for qualitative and quantitative growth both in established and emerging peripheral indications.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; “Global Market Opportunities in Peripheral Arterial and Venous Stents, Forecast to 2020.” Report #V201. Order online.

 

Peripheral Stenting Worldwide: Arterial, Venous, BMS, DES, AAA, TAA

First introduced about two decades ago as a bailout technique for suboptimal or failed iliac angioplasty, peripheral vascular stenting gradually emerged as a valuable and versatile tool for a variety of primary and adjuvant applications outside the domain of coronary and cerebral vasculature.  Today, peripheral vascular stenting techniques are commonly employed in the management of the most prevalent occlusive circulatory disorders and other pathologies affecting the abdominal and thoracic aortic tree and lower extremity arterial bed. Stents are also increasingly used in the management of the debilitating conditions like venous outflow obstruction associated with deep venous thrombosis and chronic venous insufficiency.

Notwithstanding a relative maturity of the core technology platforms and somewhat problematic opportunities for conversion to value-adding peripheral drug-eluting systems, peripheral vascular stenting appears to have a significant room for qualitative and quantitative growth both in established and emerging peripheral indications.

A panoply of stenting systems are available for the management of occlusive disorders and other pathologies affecting peripheral arterial and venous vasculature. Systems include lower extremity bare metal and drug-eluting stents for treatment of symptomatic PAD and critical limb ischemia resulting from iliac, femoropopliteal and infrapopliteal occlusive disease; stent-grafting devices used in endovascular repair of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms; as well as a subset of indication-specific and multipurpose peripheral stents used in recanalization of iliofemoral and iliocaval occlusions resulting in CVI.

In 2015, these peripheral stenting systems were employed in approximately 1.565 million revascularization procedures worldwide, of which the lower extremity arterial stenting accounted for almost 1.252 million interventions (or 80.9%), followed by AAA and TAA endovascular repairs with 162.4 thousand interventions (or 10.5%) and peripheral venous stenting used in an estimated 132.6 thousand patients (or 8.6% of the total).

The U.S. clinical practices performed almost 528 thousand covered peripheral arterial and venous procedures (or 34.1% of the worldwide total), followed by the largest Western European states with over 511 thousand interventions (or 33.1%), major Asian-Pacific states with close to 377 thousand interventions (or 24.4%), and the rest-of-the-world with about 131 thousand peripheral stent-based interventions (or 8.4%).

Below is illustrated the global market for peripheral stenting by region in 2016 and by segment from 2014 to 2020.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #V201. Available online.

 

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #V201. Available online.

Global Dynamics of Surgical and Interventional Cardiovascular Procedures, 2015-2022

Publishing June 2016:
Global Dynamics of Surgical and Interventional Cardiovascular Procedures, 2015-2022

This is a global report from MedMarket Diligence detailing from 2015 to 2022 the volume of interventional and surgical cardiovascular procedures, including open heart, peripheral vascular, cerebrovascular and all associated endovascular interventions.

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Section 1: Common Acute and Chronic Cardiovascular Conditions Targeted by Surgical and Transcatheter Interventions

1.1     Ischemic Heart Disease

1.1.1     Angina Pectoris
1.1.2     Acute Myocardial Infarction
1.1.3     Incidence, Prevalence, Established Treatment Modalities

1.2     Heart Failure

1.2.1     Incidence, Prevalence, Established Treatment Modalities

1.3     Peripheral Artery Disease

1.3.1     Critical Limb Ischemia
1.3.2     Incidence, Prevalence, Established Treatment Modalities
1.3.3     Aortic Aneurysm
1.3.4     Incidence, Prevalence, Established Treatment Modalities

1.4     Peripheral Venous Disorders

1.4.1     Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism
1.4.2     Chronic Venous Insufficiency and Varicose Veins
1.4.3     Incidence, Prevalence, Established Treatment Modalities

1.5     Cerebrovascular Disorders

1.5.1     Cerebrovascular Occlusions and Acute Ischemic Stroke
1.5.2     Cerebral Aneurysm & AVM and Hemorrhagic Stroke
1.5.3     Incidence, Prevalence, Established Treatment Modalities

1.6     Structural Heart Disorders

1.6.1     Congenital Heart Defects

1.6.1.1     Incidence, Prevalence, Established Treatment Modalities

1.6.2     Valvular Disorders

1.6.2.1     Incidence, Prevalence, Established Treatment Modalities

1.7     Cardiac Rhythm Disorders

1.7.1     Bradycardia
1.7.2     Tachycardia

1.7.2.1     Atrial Fibrillation

1.7.3     Incidence, Prevalence, Established Treatment Modalities

Section 2: Current and Projected Volumes of Therapeutic Interventional and Surgical Cardiovascular Procedures

2.1    Coronary Artery Revascularization

2.1.1    Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

2.1.1.1    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.1.2    Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

2.1.2.1    Coronary Angioplasty and Stenting

2.1.2.1.1 Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.1.2.2    CoronaryMechanical and Laser Atherectomy

2.1.2.2.1 Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.1.2.3    Mechanical Thrombectomy

2.1.2.3.1 Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.2    Acute and Chronic Heart Failure Management

2.2.1    Ventricular Assist Device Placement

2.2.1.1    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.2.2    Total Artificial Heart Implantation

2.2.2.1    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.2.3    Donor Heart Transplantation

2.2.3.1    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.3    Peripheral Artery Revascularization

2.3.1    Lower Extremity Arterial Bypass Surgery

2.3.1.1    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.3.2     Percutaneous Transcatheter Interventions

2.3.2.1    Angioplasty and Stenting

2.3.2.1.1 PTA and Bare Metal Stenting
2.3.2.1.2 PTA and Drug-Eluting Stenting
2.3.2.1.3 PTA with Drug-Coated Balloons
2.3.2.1.4 Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.3.2.2    Mechanical and Laser Atherectomy

2.3.2.2.1 Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.3.2.3    Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis and Thrombectomy

2.3.2.3.1 Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.4    Aortic Aneurysm Repair

2.4.1    Surgical AAA and TAA Repair
2.4.2    Endovascular AAA and TAA Repaire
2.4.3    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.5    DVT and CVI Management

2.5.1    Vena Cava Filter Placement

2.5.1.1    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.5.2    Endovenous Ablation

2.5.2.1    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.5.3    Venous Revascularization

2.5.3.1    Mechanical Thrombectomy
2.5.3.2    Venous Angioplasty and Stenting
2.5.3.2     Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.6    Acute Stroke Prophylaxis and Treatment

2.6.1    Carotid Artery Stenosis Management

2.6.1.1    Carotid Endarterectomy
2.6.1.2    Carotid Artery Stenting
2.6.1.3    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.6.2    Cerebral Thrombectomy

2.6.2.1    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.6.3    Cerebral Aneurysm and AVM Repair

2.6.3.1    Cerebral Aneurysm and AVM Surgical Clipping
2.6.3.2    Cerebral Aneurysm and AVM Coiling & Flow Diversion
2.6.3.3    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.7    Treatment of Structural Heart Disorders

2.7.1     Congenital Heart Defect Repair

2.7.1.1    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.7.2    Heart Valve Repair and Replacement

2.7.2.1    Heart Valve Repair and Replacement Surgery
2.7.2.2    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes
2.7.2.3    Transcatheter Valve Repair and Replacement
2.7.2.4    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.8    Cardiac Rhythm Management

2.8.1    Implantable Pulse Generator-Based Therapy

2.8.1.1    Pacemaker Implantation
2.8.1.2    Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Placement
2.8.1.3    Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device Placement
2.8.1.4    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

2.8.2    Arrhythmia Ablation Therapy

2.8.2.1    Standard SVT Ablation
2.8.2.2    Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes
2.8.2.3    AFib Ablation

2.8.2.3.1 Surgical AFib Ablation
2.8.2.3.2 Transcatheter AFib Ablation
2.8.2.3.3 Utilization Trends and Procedure Volumes

Section 3: Country Healthcare Profiles

3.1    United States and Other Americas

3.1.1    United States
3.1.2    Brazil
3.1.3    Canada
3.1.4    Mexico

3.2    Largest West European States

3.2.1    France
3.2.2    Germany
3.2.3    Italy
3.2.4    Spain
3.2.5    United Kingdom

3.3    Major Asian States

3.3.1    China
3.3.2    India
3.3.3    Japan


Global Dynamics of Surgical and Interventional Cardiovascular Procedures, 2015-2022
June 2016
Price:  $3,950 (print or PDF; add $200 for both).  Site/Global License also available.
For immediate download, order online or fax your order form.  Site/Global License also available.

 Questions? >> reports@mediligence.com.

 

 

Wound healing factors; Growth in peripheral stenting; Nanomed applications

From our weekly email to blog subscribers…

Extrinsic Factors Affecting Wound Healing

From Report #S251, “Worldwide Wound Management, Forecast to 2024: Established and Emerging Products, Technologies and Markets in the Americas, Europe, Asia/Pacific and Rest of World.”

Extrinsic factors affecting wound healing include:

Mechanical stress
Debris
Temperature
Desiccation and maceration
Infection
Chemical stress
Medications
Other factors

Mechanical stress factors include pressure, shear, and friction. Pressure can result from immobility, such as experienced by a bed- or chair-bound patient, or local pressures generated by a cast or poorly fitting shoe on a diabetic foot. When pressure is applied to an area for sufficient time and duration, blood flow to the area is compromised and healing cannot take place. Shear forces may occlude blood vessels, and disrupt or damage granulation tissue. Friction wears away newly formed epithelium or granulation tissue and may return the wound to the inflammatory phase.

Debris, such as necrotic tissue or foreign material, must be removed from the wound site in order to allow the wound to progress from the inflammatory stage to the proliferative stage of healing. Necrotic debris includes eschar and slough. The removal of necrotic tissue is called debridement and may be accomplished by mechanical, chemical, autolytic, or surgical means. Foreign material may include sutures, dressing residues, fibers shed by dressings, and foreign material which were introduced during the wounding process, such as dirt or glass.

Temperature controls the rate of chemical and enzymatic processes occurring within the wound and the metabolism of cells and tissue engaged in the repair process. Frequent dressing changes or wound cleansing with room temperature solutions may reduce wound temperature, often requiring several hours for recovery to physiological levels. Thus, wound dressings that promote a “cooling” effect, while they may help to decrease pain, may not support wound repair.

Desiccation of the wound surface removes the physiological fluids that support wound healing activity. Dry wounds are more painful, itchy, and produce scab material in an attempt to reduce fluid loss. Cell proliferation, leukocyte activity, wound contraction, and revascularization are all reduced in a dry environment. Epithelialization is drastically slowed in the presence of scab tissue that forces epithelial cells to burrow rather than freely migrate over granulation tissue. Advanced wound dressings provide protection against desiccation.

Maceration resulting from prolonged exposure to moisture may occur from incontinence, sweat accumulation, or excess exudates. Maceration can lead to enlargement of the wound, increased susceptibility to mechanical forces, and infection. Advanced wound products are designed to remove sources of moisture, manage wound exudates, and protect skin at the edges of the wound from exposure to exudates, incontinence, or perspiration.

Infection at the wound site will ensure that the healing process remains in the inflammatory phase. Pathogenic microbes in the wound compete with macrophages and fibroblasts for limited resources and may cause further necrosis in the wound bed. Serious wound infection can lead to sepsis and death. While all ulcers are considered contaminated, the diagnosis of infection is made when the wound culture demonstrates bacterial counts in excess of 105 microorganisms per gram of tissue. The clinical signs of wound infection are erythema, heat, local swelling, and pain.

Chemical stress is often applied to the wound through the use of antiseptics and cleansing agents. Routine, prolonged use of iodine, peroxide, chlorhexidine, alcohol, and acetic acid has been shown to damage cells and tissue involved in wound repair. Their use is now primarily limited to those wounds and circumstances when infection risk is high. The use of such products is rapidly discontinued in favor of using less cytotoxic agents, such as saline and nonionic surfactants.

Medication may have significant effects on the phases of wound healing. Anti-inflammatory drugs such as steroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may reduce the inflammatory response necessary to prepare the wound bed for granulation. Chemotherapeutic agents affect the function of normal cells as well as their target tumor tissue; their effects include reduction in the inflammatory response, suppression of protein synthesis, and inhibition of cell reproduction. Immunosuppressive drugs reduce WBC counts, reducing inflammatory activities and increasing the risk of wound infection.

Other extrinsic factors that may affect wound healing include alcohol abuse, smoking, and radiation therapy. Alcohol abuse and smoking interfere with body’s defense system, and side effects from radiation treatments include specific disruptions to the immune system, including suppression of leukocyte production that increases the risk of infection in ulcers. Radiation for treatment of cancer causes secondary complications to the skin and underlying tissue. Early signs of radiation side effects include acute inflammation, exudation, and scabbing. Later signs, which may appear four to six months after radiation, include woody, fibrous, and edematous skin. Advanced radiated skin appearances can include avascular tissue and ulcerations in the circumscribed area of the original radiation. The radiated wound may not become evident until as long as 10-20 years after the end of therapy.

Source: “Wound Management to 2024”, Report #S251.


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Source: “Global Market Opportunities in Peripheral Arterial and Venous Stents, Forecast to 2020”, Report #V201.


Selected Therapeutic and Diagnostic Applications of Nanotechnology in Medicine

Below are selected applications for neuromedical technologies in development or on the market currently.

Drug Delivery
Chemotherapy drug delivery
Magnetic nanoparticles attached to cancer cells
Nanoparticles carrying drugs to arterial wall plaques
Therapeutic magnetic carriers (TMMC) [guided using magnetic resonance navigation, or MRN]

Drugs and Therapies
Diabetes
Combatting antimicrobial resistance
Alzheimer’s Disease
Infectious Disease
Arthritis

Tissue, cell and genetic engineering involving nanomedical tools
Nanomedical tools in gene therapy for inherited diseases
Artificial kidney
ACL replacements
Ophthalmology
Implanted nanodevices for alleviation of pain

Biomaterials 

Nanomedicine and Personalized Treatments

Source: Report #T650, “Global Nanomedical Technologies, Markets and Opportunities, 2016-2021”. Report #T650.