Market fragmentation and growth, decline in wound management

The market for wound management products — as varied as negative pressure wound therapy, skin grafts, hydrogel dressings, and growth factors — is a sort of free-for-all of offerings designed to accelerate healing, reduce treatment costs, yield better outcomes, or all of these and more. With so many sectors, and with well-established ones tending toward commodity, there can be many competitors, with few having significant market shares. Yet in several areas, quite remarkable growth is still available.  Excluding traditional bandage and dressings, three companies — S&N, Acelity and Mölnlycke — control over half the worldwide market.

Global Advanced Wound Market Market Shares

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S251. Order online.

Growth is coming in the advanced areas of bioengineered skin, the ever-needed antimicrobials, and the great demand for foam dressings.


Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S251. Order online.

 

Viewed another way, with size and growth mapped relative to each other…

 

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S251. Order online.

The U.S. remains the biggest consumer of wound management products, and this is not expected to materially change. Europe is seeing relative decline, however, as Asia Pacific demand ramps up:

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S251. Order online.


The MedMarket Diligence report #S251, “Worldwide Wound Management, Forecast to 2024: Established and Emerging Products, Technologies and Markets in the Americas, Europe, Asia/Pacific and Rest of World,” is detailed at link and is available for purchase and download online

Wound Hemostasis, Closure, and Sealing in the U.S. versus Asia/Pacific, 2015-2022

Sales of sealants, glues, and hemostats projected to 2022 for the U.S. and Asia/Pacific. While these products have had tremendous success in Japan, their sales in the rest of Asia/Pacific have not yet caught up to Japan, let alone to the U.S.

But that is expected to change as the most significant growth in these markets will indeed be coming from China, Korea, Australia, India, and elsewhere in these emerging markets.

Sales of Sealants, Glues, and Hemostats in the
U.S. and Asia/Pacific Markets, 2015-2022

Note: For direct comparative purposes, sales in these markets are shown on the same vertical scale.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290. Available for purchase/download online.

Technologies at Medtech Startups, December 2016

Below is a list of technologies under development at startups identified thus far in December 2016 and included in the Medtech Startups Database:

  • Nanoparticle-based imaging for the treatment of epilepsy.
  • Implantable device for continuous relief of congestive heart failure.
  • Nanofiber technology for soft tissue repair.
  • Technology to facilitate intubation.
  • Medical device to manage skin complications suffered by ileostomy patients.
  • An implant for arthritis sufferers that mimics the natural motions of the joint.
  • Embolic protection device used during TAVR procedures.
  • Glucose monitor for diabetes using low-power RF/Microwave detection in fingertips.
  • Novel disinfection and sterilization solutions.
  • Drug delivery.
  • Dental and orthopedic applications of nanomaterials.
  • Catheter and guidewire technologies.

For a comprehensive list of the technologies at medtech startups identified by month, see link.

Medical and Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Hemostats, to 2022

There are several different classes of surgical sealants, glues and hemostatic products used to prevent or stop bleeding, or to close a wound or reinforce a suture line. These include fibrin sealants, surgical sealants, mechanical hemostats, active hemostats, flowable hemostats, and glues. Both sealants and medical glues are increasingly used either as an adjunct to sutures or to replace sutures.

Medical Sealants

Fibrin sealants are made of a combination of thrombin and fibrinogen. These sealants may be sprayed on the bleeding surface, or applied using a patch. Surgical sealants might be made of glutaraldehyde and bovine serum albumin, polyethylene glycol polymers, and cyanoacrylates.

Sealants are most often used to stop bleeding over a large area. If the surgeon wishes to fasten down a flap without using sutures, or in addition to using sutures, then the product used is usually a medical glue.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290.

Hemostatic Products

The surgeon and the perioperative nurse have a variety of hemostats from which to choose, as they are not all alike in their applications and efficacy. Selection of the most appropriate hemostat requires training and experience, and can affect the clinical outcome, as well as decrease treatment costs. Some of the factors that enter into the decision-making process include the size of the wound, the amount of hemorrhaging, potential adverse effects, whether the procedure is MIS or open surgery, and others.

Active hemostats contain thrombin products which may be derived from several sources, such as bovine pooled plasma purification, human pooled plasma purification, or through human recombinant manufacturing processes. Flowable-type hemostats are made of a granular bovine or porcine gelatin that is combined with saline or reconstituted thrombin, forming a flowable putty that may be applied to the bleeding area.
Mechanical hemostats, such as absorbable gelatin sponge, collagen, cellulose, or polysaccharide-based hemostats applied as sponges, fleeces, bandages, or microspheres, are not included in this analysis.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290.

Medical Glues

Sealants and glues are terms which are often used interchangeably, which can be confusing. In this report, a medical glue is defined as a product used to bond two surfaces together securely. Surgeons are increasingly reaching for medical glues to either help secure a suture line, or to replace sutures entirely in the repair of soft tissues. Medical glues are also utilized in repairing bone fractures, especially for highly comminuted fractures that often involve many small fragments. This helps to spread out the force-bearing surface, rather than focusing weight-bearing on spots where a pin has been inserted.

Thus, the surgeon has a fairly wide array of products from which to choose. The choice of which surgical hemostat or sealant to use depends on several factors, including the procedure being conducted, the type of bleeding, severity of the hemorrhage, the surgeon’s experience with the products, the surgeon’s preference, the price of the product and availability at the time of surgery. For example, a product which has a long shelf life and does not require refrigeration or other special storage, and which requires no special preparation, usually holds advantages over a product which must be mixed before use, or held in a refrigerator during storage, then allowed to warm up to room temperature before use.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290.


From “Worldwide Market for Medical and Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Hemostats, 2015-2022.” See details at link. Order online.

Hemostat Sales to 2022

Owing to their ease of use, ease of handling, and general clinical utility, hemostat sales will almost double worldwide between 2016 and 2022:

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290. Order online.

Hemostat sales are exceptionally strong in the well developed economies (Japan, Australia, Korea) of Asia, and will continue to expand there with the rapidly growing contribution of China’s hemostat sales.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290. Order online.

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Wound closure and healing via sealants, glues, hemostats in development

Natural tissue healing is a highly complex dance of processes that need to be working properly in order for the body to heal. Mammals have developed the ability to heal wounds rapidly through a cascade of processes that starts with hemostasis (blood clotting) to slow or stop the loss of blood. From the moment of injury, platelets start to aggregate, as well as starting to release cytokines, chemokines and hormones. Vasoconstriction takes place as the body tries to limit the loss of blood, and several vasoactive mediators come into play, including, norepinephrine, epinephrine, prostaglandins, serotonin, and thromboxane. Activated platelets lead to formation of a clot. Next, the inflammatory steps kick in, targeting and killing microbes and launching a natural internal debridement process, which serves to clean up any damaged tissue so that reconstruction may occur. Last in the cascade are the proliferative and maturation phases. These involve the deposition of new tissue matrix materials, and are intended to lead to reconstruction of tissue organelles and cellular structure. These healing steps actually overlap one another, and do not have strict times when each process begins or ends.

A delicate physiological balance must be maintained during the healing process to ensure timely repair or regeneration of damaged tissue. Wounds may fail to heal or have a greatly increased healing time when unfavorable conditions are allowed to persist. An optimal environment must be provided to support the essential biochemical and cellular activities required for efficient wound healing and to remove or protect the wound from factors that impede the healing process.

Factors affecting wound healing may be considered in one of two categories depending on their source. Extrinsic factors impinge on the patient from the external environment, whereas intrinsic factors directly affect the performance of bodily functions through the patient’s own physiology or condition. Factors which strongly affect wound healing include smoking, diabetes, age, oxygenation, stress, obesity, certain medications, alcoholism and nutrition.

Timescales for Development of
Sealants, Glues and Hemostat Products

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Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290.

While product development continues apace, and companies are launching their products in new countries, launches of actual new products has been relatively slow. This is due most likely to the highly technical (read: expensive) nature of the product development, as well as the cost and time involved in running clinical trials, and the strong patent protection which has been erected, especially by the leading companies. The need for the products is there, but the required clinical testing is putting a brake on the markets.

In July 2015, HyperBranch announced the product launch of Adherus® AutoSpray Dural Sealant in the US. FDA clearance to market the product was obtained in March 2015. The absorbable sealant is intended for use in brain surgery and is applied over the sutures for dura repair to prevent cerebrospinal fluid from leaking out of the incision site. The Adherus® AutoSpray Dural Sealant is made of two solutions: a PEG ester solution and a polyethylenimine (PEI) solution. When mixed together, the solutions combine to form a sealant gel that is applied to the incision site. According to the company, the sealant is fully absorbed in about 90 days.

Cohera Medical launched its TissuGlu® in select US cities in November 2015. At this point, TissuGlu® is available in ten cities in the USA, while B. Braun is the distributor for the product in Germany, Spain and Portugal.

Sanyo Chemical launched its first medical device, Hydrofit, in February 2014. The company obtained the approval of the medical device under the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law in December 2011, filing it as a novel surgical hemostatic agent intended for anastomosing the arterial blood and artificial blood vessel in surgical procedures. According to the company, the product will be produced by Sanyo and marketed by Terumo.

In 2014, Cohera Medical, Inc. launched Sylys Surgical Sealant, which can be used in gastrointestinal surgery to decrease anastomotic leak. In the same year, Baxter also gained the FDA permission for Tisseel® fibrin sealant, which, according to the company, is used in almost all types of surgical procedures.

Mallinckrodt will invest in the commercial launch and ongoing market development of both PreveLeak and Raplixa in FY 2016. According to the company, both products are faster to prepare and easier to use and store than competing products. PreveLeak, a surgical sealant, is allegedly more flexible than hemostasis glue products. It is indicated for use in vascular reconstructions to achieve adjunctive hemostasis by sealing areas of leakage. PreveLeak is currently marketed in Europe through distributors.

In an example of a delayed launch, CryoLife has been working towards launch of PerClot in the US, but ran into litigation trouble with Medafor, a wholly-owned subsidiary of CR Bard. In November 2015, CryoLife announced that it had entered into a resolution with Medafor to end the patent dispute in the US District Court for the District of Delaware between the companies regarding PerClot. Under terms of the resolution, all parties agreed to end the litigation, jointly dismissing all claims and counterclaims with prejudice and waiving all appeal rights in this case.  Each party is to pay its own attorneys’ fees and costs associated with the litigation.  However, the court’s preliminary injunction entered March 31, 2015 with respect to CryoLife’s marketing and sale of PerClot in the US will remain in effect until the expiration of Medafor’s US Patent No. 6,060,461 (the “‘461 Patent”) on February 8, 2019. CryoLife management says that this will not upset their plans, as CryoLife does not expect to receive FDA market approval for PerClot before 2018, if then.


From “Sealants, Glues, Hemostats to 2022” (#S290).

The Regimens for Assessing and Treating Wound Types

Wound treatment starts with diagnosis. Acute wounds are often surgically created, or dealt with in accident and emergency (A&E) settings. Diagnosis in the acute scenario usually focuses on cleanliness and tidying of the wound edges to enable securement using sutures or glue products. If major trauma has occurred, hemostats and sealants may be required. In the chronic scenario, diagnosis is a process that occurs at every treatment session. The practitioner will examine size, appearance and odor changes to the wound, and from this process determine the ideal management. In addition, it is likely that the physician will take samples to send for microbial assessment if infection becomes a concern.

Following diagnosis and assessment, treatment will be established based on known efficacy and cost of individual dressings, knowledge of the potential products that may be used, and their availability. This will be determined by reimbursement, local purchasing decisions, and resources.

For chronic wounds, treatment often involves symptoms; many products are designed to remove aesthetically unpleasant aspects of wounds such as exudates, smell, and visibility.

Management of exudates also has a wound-healing benefit. Too much exudate leads to hydrolytic damage and maceration of the tissue and surrounding skin. Too little moisture leads to drying out of the wound and cell death. As a result, many advanced wound management products have been developed to optimize the moist wound healing environment. As a huge variety of wound conditions arise, a large number of dressings has been developed to help manage the full range of circumstances that may be encountered. These include dressings made from foams, polyurethane films, alginates, hydrocolloids, and biomaterials to manage exudates, which may be present in vast quantities (perhaps as much as two liters per square meter per day). Other products are designed to moisten the wound to optimize healing (amorphous hydrogels for example).

Much of the advanced wound management market has evolved to improve exudates management in the home setting, in order to reduce the need for visits by practitioners and the associated cost.

Types and Uses of Select Wound Care Products

    
Dressing categoryProduct examplesDescriptionPotential applications
FilmHydrofilm, Release, Tegaderm, BioclusiveComes as adhesive, thin transparent polyurethane film, and as a dressing with a low adherent pad attached to the film.Clean, dry wounds, minimal exudate; also used to cover and secure underlying absorptive dressing, and on hard-to-bandage locations, such as heel.
FoamPermaFoam
PolyMem
Biatain
Polyurethane foam dressing available in sheets or in cavity filling shapes. Some foam dressing have a semipermeable, waterproof layer as the outer layer of the dressingFacilitates a moist wound environment for healing. Used to clean granulating wounds which have minimal exudate.
HydrogelHydrosorb Gel Sheet, Purilon, Aquasorb, DuoDerm, Intrasite Gel, GranugelColloids which consist of polymers that expand in water. Available in gels, sheets, hydrogel-impregnated dressings.Provides moist wound environment for cell migration, reduces pain, helps to rehydrate eschar. Used on dry, sloughy or necrotic wounds.
HydrocolloidCombiDERM, Hydrocoll, Comfeel, DuoDerm CGF Extra Thin, Granuflex, Tegasorb, Nu-DermMade of hydroactive or hydrophilic particles attached to a hydrophobic polymer. The hydrophilic particles absorb moisture from the wound, convert it to a gel at the interface with the wound. Conforms to wound surface; waterproof and bacteria proof.Gel formation at wound interface provides moist wound environment. Dry necrotic wounds, or for wounds with minimal exudate. Also used for granulating wounds.
AlginateAlgiSite, Sorbalgon Curasorb, Kaltogel, Kaltostat, SeaSorb, TegagelA natural polysaccharide derived from seaweed; available in a range of sizes, as well as in ribbons and ropes.Because highly absorbent, used for wounds with copious exudate. Can be used in rope form for packing exudative wound cavities or sinus tracts.
AntimicrobialBiatain Ag
Atrauman Ag
MediHoney
Both silver and honey are used as antimicrobial elements in dressings.Silver: Requires wound to be moderately exudative to activate the silver, in order to be effective
NPWDSNa
V.A.C. Ulta
PICO
Renasys (not in USA)
Prospera PRO series
Invia Liberty
Computerized vacuum device applies continuous or intermittent negative or sub-atmospheric pressure to the wound surface. NPWT accelerates wound healing, reduces time to wound closure. Comes in both stationary and portable versions.May be used for traumatic acute wound, open amputations, open abdomen, etc. Seems to increase burn wound perfusion. Also used in management of DFUs. Contraindicated for arterial insufficiency ulcers. Not to be used if necrotic tissue is present in over 30% of the wound.
Bioengineered Skin and Skin SubstitutesAlloDerm, AlloMax, FlexHD, DermACELL, DermaMatrix, DermaPure, Graftjacket Regenerative Tissue Matrix, PriMatrix, SurgiMend PRS, Strattice Reconstructive Tissue Matrix, Permacol, EpiFix, OASIS Wound Matrix, Apligraf, Dermagraft, Integra Dermal Regeneration Template, TransCyteBio-engineered skin and soft tissue substitutes may be derived from human tissue (autologous or allogeneic), xenographic, synthetic materials, or a composite of these materials.Burns, trauma wounds, DFUs, VLUs, pressure ulcers, postsurgical breast reconstruction, bullous diseases

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S251.

In some cases, the wound may be covered by a black necrotic tissue or yellow sloughy material. These materials develop from dead cells, nucleic acid materials, and denatured proteins. In order for new tissue to be laid down, this dead material needs to be removed. It may be done using hydrolytic debridement using hydrogels that soften the necrotic tissue, or by the use of enzymes. Surgical debridement is another option, but non-surgical debridement has the advantage that it is usually less painful and can be performed with fewer materials, less expertise, and less mess. It is possible to perform non-surgical debridement in the home setting. Debridement can also be performed to selectively remove dead tissue and thus encourage repair. Enzymatic debriders have been able to command a premium price in the market, and built a sizeable share of the wound management market, particularly during the 1990s when treatment in the home environment increased as a result of reductions in hospital-based treatment. These products are described in the section on cleansers and debriders.

Occasionally healthcare practitioners put maggots to work for wound debridement. Though esthetically unpleasant, maggots are very effective debriding agents because they distinguish rigorously between dead and living tissue. Military surgeons noticed the beneficial effect of maggots on soldiers’ wounds centuries ago, but maggot debridement therapy (MDT) as it is practiced today began in the 1920s and has lately been undergoing something of a revival. The maggots used have been disinfected during the egg stage so that they do not carry bacteria into the wound. The larvae preferentially consume dead tissue, they excrete an antibacterial agent, and they stimulate wound healing.

At the other end of the technological scale are skin substitutes, which have been developed to help in the management of extensive wounds such as burns. Autologous skin grafting is a well-established therapeutic technique; postage-stamp-sized sections of healthy skin are cultured and grown in vitro, then placed over the raw wound surface to serve as a focus for re-epithelialization. However, this process takes time; the wound is highly vulnerable to infection while the skin graft is being grown. A number of companies have developed alternatives in the form of synthetic skin substitutes. These are described further in the next section of the report.

A number of products have also been developed to deal with sloughy and infected wounds. These often incorporate antimicrobial agents. Often, infected wounds have a very unpleasant odor; a range of odor control dressings has arisen to deal with this.

Once wounds begin to heal, the amount of exudate starts to decrease. Some dressing products preserve moisture but are also non-adhesive, so that the dressing does not adhere to the new epithelializing skin. These products are called non-adherent dressings and include a range of tulle dressings, which usually consist of a loose weave of non-adherent fabric designed to allow exudates to pass through the gaps. A subgroup of dressings is designed to keep the skin moist in order to reduce scarring after healing.

For wounds that do not appear to be healing, a number of companies have explored the potential to add growth factors and cells to promote and maintain healing. In addition, companies have attempted to use energy sources to accelerate wound healing, and these are described in the section on physical treatments. The main example of physical treatment is the use of devices which apply negative pressure over the wound and have been shown to dramatically shorten the healing of diabetic ulcers and other chronic wounds.

Often, a dressing will serve more than one purpose. Therefore, it is difficult to generalize and collect only dressings that serve one purpose into a single category. For example, Systagenix’s Actisorb Plus (Systagenix is now owned by Acelity) is a woven, low-adherent odor control antimicrobial dressing designed to optimize moist wound healing through its exudates handling properties.


From, Worldwide Wound Management, Forecast to 2024; MedMarket Diligence, LLC. 

Wound management practice patterns, products by wound type

From Report #S251, “Wound Management to 2024”.

Surgical wounds account for the vast majority of skin injuries. We estimate that there are approximately 100 million surgical incisions per year, growing at 3.1% CAGR, that require some wound management treatment. About 16 million operative procedures were performed in acute care hospitals in the USA. Approximately 80% of surgical incisions use some form of closure product: sutures, staples, and tapes. Many employ hemostasis products, and use fabric bandages and surgical dressings.

Surgical procedures generate a preponderance of acute wounds with uneventful healing and a lower number of chronic wounds, such as those generated by wound dehiscence or postoperative infection. Surgical wounds are most often closed by primary intention, where the two sides across the incision line are brought close and mechanically held together. Overall the severity and size of surgical wounds will continue to decrease as a result of the continuing trend toward minimally invasive surgery.

Surgical wounds that involve substantial tissue loss or may be infected are allowed to heal by secondary intention where the wound is left open under dressings and allowed to fill by granulation and close by epithelialization. Some surgical wounds may be closed through delayed primary intention where they are left open until such time as it is felt it is safe to suture or glue the wound closed.

Traumatic wounds occur at the rate of 50 million or more every year worldwide. They require cleansing and treatment with low-adherent dressings to cover the wound, prevent infection, and allow healing by primary intention. Lacerations are a specific type of trauma wound that are generally minor in nature and require cleansing and dressing for a shorter period. There are approximately 20 million lacerations a year as a result of cuts and grazes; they can usually be treated in the doctors’ surgery, outpatient medical center or hospital A&E departments.

Burn wounds can be divided into minor burns, medically treated, and hospitalized cases. Outpatient burn wounds are often treated at home, at the doctor’s surgery, or at outpatient clinics. As a result, a large number of these wounds never enter the formal health service system. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), globally about 11 million people are burned each year severely enough to require medical treatment. We estimate that approximately 3.5 million burns in this category do enter the outpatient health service system and receive some level of medical attention. In countries with more developed medical systems, these burns are treated using hydrogels and advanced wound care products, and they may even be treated with consumer-based products for wound healing.

Medically treated burn wounds usually receive more informed care to remove heat from the tissue, maintain hydration, and prevent infection. Advanced wound care products are used for these wounds. There are approximately 6.0 million burns such as this that are treated medically every year.

Hospitalized burn wounds are rarer and require more advanced and expensive care. These victims require significant care, nutrition, debridement, tissue grafting and often tissue engineering where available. They also require significant follow-up care and rehabilitation to mobilize new tissue, and physiotherapy to address changes in physiology. Growth rates within the burns categories are approximately 1.0% per annum.

Chronic wounds generally take longer to heal, and care is enormously variable, as is the time to heal. There are approximately 7.4 million pressure ulcers in the world that require treatment every year. Many chronic wounds around the world are treated sub-optimally with general wound care products designed to cover and absorb some exudates. The optimal treatment for these wounds is to receive advanced wound management products and appropriate care to address the underlying defect that has caused the chronic wound; in the case of pressure ulcers a number of advanced devices exist to reduce pressure for patients. There are approximately 9.7 million venous ulcers, and approximately 10.0 million diabetic ulcers in the world requiring treatment. Chronic wounds are growing in incidence due to the growing age of the population, and the growth is also due to increasing awareness and improved diagnosis. Growth rates for pressure and venous ulcers are 6%–7% in the developed world as a result of these factors.

Diabetic ulcers are growing more rapidly due mainly to increased incidence of both Type I and maturity-onset diabetes in the developed countries around the world. The prevalence of diabetic ulcers is rising at 9% annually. Every year 5% of diabetics develop foot ulcers and 1% require amputation. The recurrence rate of diabetic foot ulcers is 66%; the amputation rate rises to 12% with subsequent ulcerations. At present, this pool of patients is growing faster than the new technologies are reducing the incidence of wounds by healing them.

Wound management products are also used for a number of other conditions including amputations, carcinomas, melanomas, and other complicated skin cancers, all of which are on the increase.

A significant feature of all wounds is the likelihood of pathological infection occurring. Surgical wounds are no exception, and average levels of infection of surgical wounds are in the range of 7%–10%, depending upon the procedure. These infections can be prevented by appropriate cleanliness, surgical discipline and skill, wound care therapy, and antibiotic prophylaxis. Infections usually lead to more extensive wound care time, the use of more expensive products and drugs, significantly increased therapist time, and increased morbidity and rehabilitation time. A large number of wounds will also be sutured to accelerate closure, and a proportion of these will undergo dehiscence and require aftercare for healing to occur.

For the detailed coverage of wounds, wound management products, companies, and markets, see report #S251, “Worldwide Wound Management to 2024”.

Upside from innovation, emerging markets for sealants, glues, hemostats

A great deal of market development has yet to take place in the field of wound closure, especially for advanced sealants, glues, and hemostats — let’s just for convenience call them “liquid closure” (as opposed to sutures/staples/clips). It is currently in an evolving, growing, consolidating, tweaking state of change, with currently more upside coming out of Asia than from innovations in sealing, adhesion, or hemostasis.

Market players dominant in one geography are absent in others. The rate of market growth arising from innovation lags growth from penetrating emerging markets, where manufacturers have rushed to pick the easy fruit.

Challenges remain in order for “liquid closure” to more deeply penetrate a caseload otherwise served by docs using strong, easy-to-use sutures, clips, and staples. Sealants are terrific in adjunctive use by “caulking” suture lines to ensure nothing leaks between, no matter how strongly the clips, etc. are holding. But the strength of sealing and adhesion are not sufficient for most products to do the job alone. A “liquid closure” must be many things with high standards that have largely yet to be met.

Hemostats, though, given their simple function to keep the life from draining out of people, have succeeded handsomely in saving lives.

For the near term, the growth in liquid closure sales is evident most strongly in Asia, with income and other drivers there giving life to an otherwise staid market, for the time being…

sealants glues hemostat overlap
MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290.

List of high growth medtech products

Below is a table with a list of the market segments demonstrating greater than 10% compound annual growth rate for the associated region through 2022, drawn from our reports on tissue engineering & cell therapy, wound management, ablation technologies, stroke, peripheral stents, and sealants/glues/hemostats. Products with over 10% CAGR in sales are shown in descending order of CAGR.

RankProductTopicRegion
1General, gastrointestinal, ob/gyn, othertissue/cellWW
2Ophthalmologytissue/cellWW
3Organ Replacement/ Repairtissue/cellWW
4Urologicaltissue/cellWW
5Neurologicaltissue/cellWW
6Autoimmune Diseasestissue/cellWW
7CV/ Vasculartissue/cellWW
8Bioengineered skin and skin substituteswoundRest of A/P
9Peripheral drug-eluting stents (A/P)peripheral interventionalA/P
10Peripheral drug eluting stentsperipheral interventionalRoW
11Peripheral drug-eluting stents (US)peripheral interventionalUS
12Negative pressure wound therapywoundGermany
13Hydrocolloid dressingswoundRest of A/P
14Cancertissue/cellWW
15Foam dressingswoundRest of A/P
16Growth factorswoundRest of A/P
17Alginate dressingswoundRest of A/P
18Dentaltissue/cellWW
19Bioengineered skin and skin substituteswoundJapan
20Hemostatssealants, glues, hemostatsA/P
21Skin/ Integumentarytissue/cellWW
22Bioengineered skin and skin substitutessealants, glues, hemostatsUS
23Bioengineered skin and skin substitutessealants, glues, hemostatsWW
24Film dressingswoundRest of A/P
25Surgical sealantssealants, glues, hemostatsA/P
26Hydrogel dressingswoundRest of A/P
27TAA Stent graftsperipheral interventionalA/P
28Negative pressure wound therapywoundRoW
29Biological gluessealants, glues, hemostatsA/P
30FoamwoundRoW
31HydrocolloidwoundGermany
32AAA Stent graftsperipheral interventionalA/P
33Cerebral thrombectomy systemsstrokeA/P
34High-strength medical gluessealants, glues, hemostatsA/P
35Carotid artery stenting systemsstrokeA/P
36Cardiac RF ablation productsablationA/P
37Alginate dressingswoundGermany
38Peripheral venous stentsperipheral interventionalA/P
39Cerebral thrombectomy systemsstrokeUS
40Left atrial appendage closure systemsstrokeA/P
41Cyanoacrylate gluessealants, glues, hemostatsA/P
42Foam dressingswoundRest of EU
43Foam dressingswoundKorea
44Cryoablation cardiac & vascular productsablationA/P
45Bioengineered skin and skin substituteswoundGermany
46Thrombin, collagen & gelatin-based sealantssealants, glues, hemostatsA/P
47Cardiac RF ablation productsablationRoW
48Bioengineered skin and skin substituteswoundRoW
49Microwave oncologic ablation productsablationA/P

Note source links: Tissue/Cell, Wound, Sealants/Glues/Hemostats, Peripheral Stents, Stroke, Ablation.

Source: MedMarket Diligence Reports