Regional Markets for Surgical Sealants, 2015 and 2022

The fastest growth in the sales of surgical sealants over the next decade will be in the Asia-Pacific region, driven primarily by very strong healthcare market growth in China, and reaching a CAGR (2016-2022) of at least 13.97%. The growth rate in China would be even higher, but will be dampened for the time being by the lack of surgeons trained in the proper use of these products, as well as the limitations of reaching a dispersed patient population. Nonetheless, the A/P share of the global sealants market will double in the next seven years!

Below illustrates the geographic distribution of surgical sealants (fibrin and others) in 2015.

Regional Markets for Sealants, Fibrin and Other Sealant Products,
2015 & 2022, USD Millions

2015screen-shot-2016-11-11-at-8-52-44-am

2022

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Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290.

Wound closure and healing via sealants, glues, hemostats in development

Natural tissue healing is a highly complex dance of processes that need to be working properly in order for the body to heal. Mammals have developed the ability to heal wounds rapidly through a cascade of processes that starts with hemostasis (blood clotting) to slow or stop the loss of blood. From the moment of injury, platelets start to aggregate, as well as starting to release cytokines, chemokines and hormones. Vasoconstriction takes place as the body tries to limit the loss of blood, and several vasoactive mediators come into play, including, norepinephrine, epinephrine, prostaglandins, serotonin, and thromboxane. Activated platelets lead to formation of a clot. Next, the inflammatory steps kick in, targeting and killing microbes and launching a natural internal debridement process, which serves to clean up any damaged tissue so that reconstruction may occur. Last in the cascade are the proliferative and maturation phases. These involve the deposition of new tissue matrix materials, and are intended to lead to reconstruction of tissue organelles and cellular structure. These healing steps actually overlap one another, and do not have strict times when each process begins or ends.

A delicate physiological balance must be maintained during the healing process to ensure timely repair or regeneration of damaged tissue. Wounds may fail to heal or have a greatly increased healing time when unfavorable conditions are allowed to persist. An optimal environment must be provided to support the essential biochemical and cellular activities required for efficient wound healing and to remove or protect the wound from factors that impede the healing process.

Factors affecting wound healing may be considered in one of two categories depending on their source. Extrinsic factors impinge on the patient from the external environment, whereas intrinsic factors directly affect the performance of bodily functions through the patient’s own physiology or condition. Factors which strongly affect wound healing include smoking, diabetes, age, oxygenation, stress, obesity, certain medications, alcoholism and nutrition.

Timescales for Development of
Sealants, Glues and Hemostat Products

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Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290.

While product development continues apace, and companies are launching their products in new countries, launches of actual new products has been relatively slow. This is due most likely to the highly technical (read: expensive) nature of the product development, as well as the cost and time involved in running clinical trials, and the strong patent protection which has been erected, especially by the leading companies. The need for the products is there, but the required clinical testing is putting a brake on the markets.

In July 2015, HyperBranch announced the product launch of Adherus® AutoSpray Dural Sealant in the US. FDA clearance to market the product was obtained in March 2015. The absorbable sealant is intended for use in brain surgery and is applied over the sutures for dura repair to prevent cerebrospinal fluid from leaking out of the incision site. The Adherus® AutoSpray Dural Sealant is made of two solutions: a PEG ester solution and a polyethylenimine (PEI) solution. When mixed together, the solutions combine to form a sealant gel that is applied to the incision site. According to the company, the sealant is fully absorbed in about 90 days.

Cohera Medical launched its TissuGlu® in select US cities in November 2015. At this point, TissuGlu® is available in ten cities in the USA, while B. Braun is the distributor for the product in Germany, Spain and Portugal.

Sanyo Chemical launched its first medical device, Hydrofit, in February 2014. The company obtained the approval of the medical device under the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law in December 2011, filing it as a novel surgical hemostatic agent intended for anastomosing the arterial blood and artificial blood vessel in surgical procedures. According to the company, the product will be produced by Sanyo and marketed by Terumo.

In 2014, Cohera Medical, Inc. launched Sylys Surgical Sealant, which can be used in gastrointestinal surgery to decrease anastomotic leak. In the same year, Baxter also gained the FDA permission for Tisseel® fibrin sealant, which, according to the company, is used in almost all types of surgical procedures.

Mallinckrodt will invest in the commercial launch and ongoing market development of both PreveLeak and Raplixa in FY 2016. According to the company, both products are faster to prepare and easier to use and store than competing products. PreveLeak, a surgical sealant, is allegedly more flexible than hemostasis glue products. It is indicated for use in vascular reconstructions to achieve adjunctive hemostasis by sealing areas of leakage. PreveLeak is currently marketed in Europe through distributors.

In an example of a delayed launch, CryoLife has been working towards launch of PerClot in the US, but ran into litigation trouble with Medafor, a wholly-owned subsidiary of CR Bard. In November 2015, CryoLife announced that it had entered into a resolution with Medafor to end the patent dispute in the US District Court for the District of Delaware between the companies regarding PerClot. Under terms of the resolution, all parties agreed to end the litigation, jointly dismissing all claims and counterclaims with prejudice and waiving all appeal rights in this case.  Each party is to pay its own attorneys’ fees and costs associated with the litigation.  However, the court’s preliminary injunction entered March 31, 2015 with respect to CryoLife’s marketing and sale of PerClot in the US will remain in effect until the expiration of Medafor’s US Patent No. 6,060,461 (the “‘461 Patent”) on February 8, 2019. CryoLife management says that this will not upset their plans, as CryoLife does not expect to receive FDA market approval for PerClot before 2018, if then.


From “Sealants, Glues, Hemostats to 2022” (#S290).

Medical, Surgical Sealants — Fibrin and Others

screen-shot-2016-10-26-at-2-23-29-pmFibrin is the result of the combination of solutions of thrombin and fibrinogen. This forms a clot just as in the body during the coagulation cascade. The thrombin then breaks the fibrinogen molecules into smaller bits of another blood protein, called fibrin. Fibrin molecules arrange themselves into a lattice with strands cross-linked by the blood component, Factor XIII. This resulting cross-linked net helps to stabilize the clot.

Numerous variants of fibrin sealant exist, including autologous products. Other, non-fibrin sealant types are thrombin, collagen & gelatin-based sealants.

Fibrin sealants are used in the US in a wide array of applications; they are used the most in orthopedic surgeries, where the penetration rate is thought to be 25-30%. Fibrin sealants can, however, be ineffective under wet surgical conditions. The penetration rate in other surgeries is estimated to be about 10-15%.

Fibrin-based sealants were originally made with bovine components. These components were judged to increase the risk of developing bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), so second-generation commercial fibrin sealants (CSF) avoided bovine-derived materials. The antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid (TXA) was used instead of bovine aprotinin. Later, the TXA was removed, again due to safety issues. Today, Ethicon’s (JNJ) Evicel is an example of this product, which Ethicon says is the only all human, aprotinin free, fibrin sealant indicated for general hemostasis. Market growth in the sealants sector is driven by the need for improved biocompatibility and stronger sealing ability—in other words, meeting the still-unsatisfied needs of physician end-users.

The current market penetration of sealant products in the US stands at about 25% of eligible surgeries, with their largest volume of use in orthopedics.

Selected Fibrin and Other Sealant Types*

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*Market status on each detailed in report S290.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Sealants, Glues, Hemostats to 2022.

 

The Regimens for Assessing and Treating Wound Types

Wound treatment starts with diagnosis. Acute wounds are often surgically created, or dealt with in accident and emergency (A&E) settings. Diagnosis in the acute scenario usually focuses on cleanliness and tidying of the wound edges to enable securement using sutures or glue products. If major trauma has occurred, hemostats and sealants may be required. In the chronic scenario, diagnosis is a process that occurs at every treatment session. The practitioner will examine size, appearance and odor changes to the wound, and from this process determine the ideal management. In addition, it is likely that the physician will take samples to send for microbial assessment if infection becomes a concern.

Following diagnosis and assessment, treatment will be established based on known efficacy and cost of individual dressings, knowledge of the potential products that may be used, and their availability. This will be determined by reimbursement, local purchasing decisions, and resources.

For chronic wounds, treatment often involves symptoms; many products are designed to remove aesthetically unpleasant aspects of wounds such as exudates, smell, and visibility.

Management of exudates also has a wound-healing benefit. Too much exudate leads to hydrolytic damage and maceration of the tissue and surrounding skin. Too little moisture leads to drying out of the wound and cell death. As a result, many advanced wound management products have been developed to optimize the moist wound healing environment. As a huge variety of wound conditions arise, a large number of dressings has been developed to help manage the full range of circumstances that may be encountered. These include dressings made from foams, polyurethane films, alginates, hydrocolloids, and biomaterials to manage exudates, which may be present in vast quantities (perhaps as much as two liters per square meter per day). Other products are designed to moisten the wound to optimize healing (amorphous hydrogels for example).

Much of the advanced wound management market has evolved to improve exudates management in the home setting, in order to reduce the need for visits by practitioners and the associated cost.

Types and Uses of Select Wound Care Products

    
Dressing categoryProduct examplesDescriptionPotential applications
FilmHydrofilm, Release, Tegaderm, BioclusiveComes as adhesive, thin transparent polyurethane film, and as a dressing with a low adherent pad attached to the film.Clean, dry wounds, minimal exudate; also used to cover and secure underlying absorptive dressing, and on hard-to-bandage locations, such as heel.
FoamPermaFoam
PolyMem
Biatain
Polyurethane foam dressing available in sheets or in cavity filling shapes. Some foam dressing have a semipermeable, waterproof layer as the outer layer of the dressingFacilitates a moist wound environment for healing. Used to clean granulating wounds which have minimal exudate.
HydrogelHydrosorb Gel Sheet, Purilon, Aquasorb, DuoDerm, Intrasite Gel, GranugelColloids which consist of polymers that expand in water. Available in gels, sheets, hydrogel-impregnated dressings.Provides moist wound environment for cell migration, reduces pain, helps to rehydrate eschar. Used on dry, sloughy or necrotic wounds.
HydrocolloidCombiDERM, Hydrocoll, Comfeel, DuoDerm CGF Extra Thin, Granuflex, Tegasorb, Nu-DermMade of hydroactive or hydrophilic particles attached to a hydrophobic polymer. The hydrophilic particles absorb moisture from the wound, convert it to a gel at the interface with the wound. Conforms to wound surface; waterproof and bacteria proof.Gel formation at wound interface provides moist wound environment. Dry necrotic wounds, or for wounds with minimal exudate. Also used for granulating wounds.
AlginateAlgiSite, Sorbalgon Curasorb, Kaltogel, Kaltostat, SeaSorb, TegagelA natural polysaccharide derived from seaweed; available in a range of sizes, as well as in ribbons and ropes.Because highly absorbent, used for wounds with copious exudate. Can be used in rope form for packing exudative wound cavities or sinus tracts.
AntimicrobialBiatain Ag
Atrauman Ag
MediHoney
Both silver and honey are used as antimicrobial elements in dressings.Silver: Requires wound to be moderately exudative to activate the silver, in order to be effective
NPWDSNa
V.A.C. Ulta
PICO
Renasys (not in USA)
Prospera PRO series
Invia Liberty
Computerized vacuum device applies continuous or intermittent negative or sub-atmospheric pressure to the wound surface. NPWT accelerates wound healing, reduces time to wound closure. Comes in both stationary and portable versions.May be used for traumatic acute wound, open amputations, open abdomen, etc. Seems to increase burn wound perfusion. Also used in management of DFUs. Contraindicated for arterial insufficiency ulcers. Not to be used if necrotic tissue is present in over 30% of the wound.
Bioengineered Skin and Skin SubstitutesAlloDerm, AlloMax, FlexHD, DermACELL, DermaMatrix, DermaPure, Graftjacket Regenerative Tissue Matrix, PriMatrix, SurgiMend PRS, Strattice Reconstructive Tissue Matrix, Permacol, EpiFix, OASIS Wound Matrix, Apligraf, Dermagraft, Integra Dermal Regeneration Template, TransCyteBio-engineered skin and soft tissue substitutes may be derived from human tissue (autologous or allogeneic), xenographic, synthetic materials, or a composite of these materials.Burns, trauma wounds, DFUs, VLUs, pressure ulcers, postsurgical breast reconstruction, bullous diseases

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S251.

In some cases, the wound may be covered by a black necrotic tissue or yellow sloughy material. These materials develop from dead cells, nucleic acid materials, and denatured proteins. In order for new tissue to be laid down, this dead material needs to be removed. It may be done using hydrolytic debridement using hydrogels that soften the necrotic tissue, or by the use of enzymes. Surgical debridement is another option, but non-surgical debridement has the advantage that it is usually less painful and can be performed with fewer materials, less expertise, and less mess. It is possible to perform non-surgical debridement in the home setting. Debridement can also be performed to selectively remove dead tissue and thus encourage repair. Enzymatic debriders have been able to command a premium price in the market, and built a sizeable share of the wound management market, particularly during the 1990s when treatment in the home environment increased as a result of reductions in hospital-based treatment. These products are described in the section on cleansers and debriders.

Occasionally healthcare practitioners put maggots to work for wound debridement. Though esthetically unpleasant, maggots are very effective debriding agents because they distinguish rigorously between dead and living tissue. Military surgeons noticed the beneficial effect of maggots on soldiers’ wounds centuries ago, but maggot debridement therapy (MDT) as it is practiced today began in the 1920s and has lately been undergoing something of a revival. The maggots used have been disinfected during the egg stage so that they do not carry bacteria into the wound. The larvae preferentially consume dead tissue, they excrete an antibacterial agent, and they stimulate wound healing.

At the other end of the technological scale are skin substitutes, which have been developed to help in the management of extensive wounds such as burns. Autologous skin grafting is a well-established therapeutic technique; postage-stamp-sized sections of healthy skin are cultured and grown in vitro, then placed over the raw wound surface to serve as a focus for re-epithelialization. However, this process takes time; the wound is highly vulnerable to infection while the skin graft is being grown. A number of companies have developed alternatives in the form of synthetic skin substitutes. These are described further in the next section of the report.

A number of products have also been developed to deal with sloughy and infected wounds. These often incorporate antimicrobial agents. Often, infected wounds have a very unpleasant odor; a range of odor control dressings has arisen to deal with this.

Once wounds begin to heal, the amount of exudate starts to decrease. Some dressing products preserve moisture but are also non-adhesive, so that the dressing does not adhere to the new epithelializing skin. These products are called non-adherent dressings and include a range of tulle dressings, which usually consist of a loose weave of non-adherent fabric designed to allow exudates to pass through the gaps. A subgroup of dressings is designed to keep the skin moist in order to reduce scarring after healing.

For wounds that do not appear to be healing, a number of companies have explored the potential to add growth factors and cells to promote and maintain healing. In addition, companies have attempted to use energy sources to accelerate wound healing, and these are described in the section on physical treatments. The main example of physical treatment is the use of devices which apply negative pressure over the wound and have been shown to dramatically shorten the healing of diabetic ulcers and other chronic wounds.

Often, a dressing will serve more than one purpose. Therefore, it is difficult to generalize and collect only dressings that serve one purpose into a single category. For example, Systagenix’s Actisorb Plus (Systagenix is now owned by Acelity) is a woven, low-adherent odor control antimicrobial dressing designed to optimize moist wound healing through its exudates handling properties.


From, Worldwide Wound Management, Forecast to 2024MedMarket Diligence, LLC.