Category Archives: surgery

topic is largely or exclusively about surgical products, technologies, markets and/or companies

The Aesthetics & Reconstructive Surgery Products Global Market

Global medical aesthetic products are to achieve sales of more than $6.5 billion in 2013. Through 2018 the market is expected to reach a value of about $10.7 billion. Europe has been witnessing relatively a slower growth of 6.6% per year. Declining purchasing power, particularly in southern Europe affects the European market and this geographical segment is estimated at $1.84 billion in 2013 to reach $1.94 billion in 2018. The U.S. and the Latin America markets will have a CAGR close to 10%. The U.S. and Latin America will experience a growth respectively of 9.2% and 10% in line with global trends. The U.S. market still represents 45% of the global market.

Screen Shot 2014-04-15 at 7.27.04 AMThe Asia/Pacific region will have an overall CAGR of more than 14.1%. Asia will experience the strongest growth through 2018 and exceed the level of the European market in 2018 to $2.24 billion. Overall, the annual growth of the world market between 2013 and 2018 should be 10% to $10.7 billion.

The injectable products (botulinum toxin and fillers mainly hyaluronic acid) constitute the top market segment in value and will have a CAGR of 10.8% until 2018, thus confirming their constant development potential. Since 2012, the toxins market marginally exceeded the dermal fillers market in the world but with a few exceptions such as Europe. The main markets for injectable products by decreasing order are the U.S., E.U., Asia and South America.

The energy-based devices (laser, radiofrequency, ultrasounds) will have an average CAGR of 10.3% until 2018. The sub-segment of body contouring devices will have an average CAGR of 12.1% until 2018. It should represent as nearly half of the activity-based equipment energy by 2018. The main markets for energy-based devices by decreasing order are the U.S., E.U. Asia and South America.

The cosmeceuticals (active cosmetics) will follow the same trend as the injectable products. The major markets for active cosmetics in decreasing order are the U.S., Asia, South America and the E.U. The market for active cosmetics in 2013 and 2018 will be $1,026 million and $1,677 million respectively. The breast implants will have a reduced progression of 5.2% per year until 2018. The major markets for breast implants by decreasing order are the U.S., South America, E.U. and Asia. The 2013 and 2018 market for breast implants will be about $1,066 and $1,370 million respectively. The two most popular cosmetic surgery procedures are still, in the world as well as for each geographical area, the liposuction and the breast augmentation with prosthetic implants. Breast implants experienced a slowdown of about 9% mainly due to concerns about the safety of their components, but this suspicion seems to disappear gradually in recent months.

More limited surgical procedures now are performed in the face, arm, or the internal face of thighs. The goal is primarily to make a change with a natural result. For the face it is readily associated with fat injection to recover volumes. Minimal invasive therapies enjoy a strong growth in 2013, especially with the new botulinum toxin. Alternative techniques to the toxin as cryomodulation begin to develop. The non-invasive techniques are increasingly linked to each other: toxin for the upper face and hyaluronic acid for the lower face, willingly associated with rejuvenation and retightening techniques of the skin by radio frequency and light peels. Far from being opposed to surgery, these techniques maintain surgery result. There is strong growth of surgical cosmetic procedures for men and women above 50 years old in Western countries due to the demand for anti-aging treatment and social pressure. These procedures increased from 28% to 36% between 2005 and 2011, this demand is also significant for invasive treatments and non-invasive.

From “Global Markets for Products and Technologies in Aesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2013-2018″, Report #S710, published by MedMarket Diligence, LLC.

Wound management spans big to small, established to startup

The worldwide wound management market is represented by a mixture of a small group of well established companies like Johnson & Johnson, 3M, KCI, Smith & Nephew, Systagenix and Covidien and a large number of mid-sized and smaller companies with niche product offerings; see Report S249 for a list of profiled companies (and note that we have profiled a select number of active companies discussed in the report).

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Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report S249.

The fastest-growing market segment is the Growth Factors market, with a compound annual growth rate well in excess of 20% annually since 2012. Favorable clinical evidence is a major driver of that growth. The largest product segment is Traditional Adhesive Dressings, followed by Negative Pressure Wound Therapy. The largely generic adhesive dressing continues to be used for the majority of wound care cases. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy is coming into increasing use as smaller devices allow use in non-hospital settings, and as the technology demonstrates efficacy.

The wound management market is, overall, a mature business sector which contains both long-established product groups and more recently developed approaches to wound care. Price competition remains the key strategy in maintaining value share for the major players. The major components of the market include:

  • Traditional wound care products, such as bandages, dressings and swabs made of generic cotton and textile fabrics.
  • Wound closure devices, including familiar devices such as sutures and staples, as well as newer methods of wound closure such as tissue sealants and glues; also hemostatic devices to help arrest bleeding while closing the wound. Wound closure devices are primarily used in surgery, and are not addressed in this report.
  • Advanced wound care (AWC) products. This umbrella covers dressings which are based on moist wound healing concepts, active therapies such as biomaterial composites and tissue engineered products, and products encompassing aspects of growth factors and angiogenesis. AWC products may be made of biopolymers, hydrocolloids, composites, foam materials, films, etc. These are used mainly for the treatment of chronic and slow-to-heal wounds.
  • Consumer wound care. This sector includes a wide range of wound care products, primarily for use in first aid. The consumer wound care market is not addressed in this report.

A company which develops expertise in engineering and manufacturing in one area of wound management will frequently leverage those skills by expanding into related areas of wound care. For this reason, a number of the leading wound management companies market products within most or all of these categories. When it comes to the advanced wound care products, wound management businesses may choose a strategy of partnering with specialist developers of these novel technologies. Such collaborations often lead to the larger firm acquiring the technology and/or the company that developed the technology, in order to bring the intellectual property in-house, as well as to optimize manufacturing and supply.

Global health care expenditure is expected to grow by at least 6% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) between 2011 and 2020. The demographic changes driving this growth include the aging of the population, the continuing increase in new technologies commanding ever higher prices, and improved understanding of disease processes. This last leads to development of new procedures, products, and therapy regimens to treat disease, which feeds (at least in the USA) into an increasing desire on the part of patients to have the latest and greatest in treatment, no matter the cost to society. Chronic wounds are born out of vascular disease and insufficiency, and diabetic conditions. These are prevalent within the older populations that are showing strongest growth in the developed economies.

Over $24 Billion in Spent on Plastic Surgery Worldwide

And that’s just the product sales including implants, fillers, and other products used for aesthetics and reconstruction. It doesn’t include the physician fees, the outpatient site fees and other money spent.

There are two parts to this, of course. Plastic surgery has two faces — reconstruction and aesthetics, the first medically-indicated and the second elective.  Of course, the surgical reconstruction of anatomy and outward appearance to restore what has been lost to disease or trauma (the medically-indicated side of plastic surgery) has  benefitted greatly by the expertise and medtech innovation of aesthetics (the elective side).  Because of this, the market for products in plastic surgery has elements of both the traditional medtech market (reimbursement, economy-independed funding) and consumer markets (elective products, sensitivity to general economic conditions).

Overall, the market for these products is growing at a compound average of 7.9%, which is a strong but not extraordinarily high growth rate for a medtech market. Within it, of course, there is wide variation in the growth rates of plastic surgery product sales. Below is illustrated the aesthetics and reconstructive surgery products market from 2013 to 2018.

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MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S710

 

Use of Surgical Sealants for Cranial and Spinal Dura

Surgical sealants have an enormous range of applications in the treatment of acute and chronic wounds, but while the majority of sealant revenues derives from their use in the hemostasis, closure and sealant of tissues to prevent blood loss…

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Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S190

… a different niche use of sealants is stopping cerebrospinal fluid leaks and other dural wound treatments associated with cranial and spinal procedures. These include their use in:

  • Cranial and spinal dural plastic surgery to prevent CSF fistulas.
  • Dural plastic surgery in residual cavities following tumor removal.
  • Dural lacerations in hemilaminectomy operations

Of this, most of the use is currently in cranial applications, but use in spinal applications is growing considerably faster:

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Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S190

 

 

 

The increasing problem of chronic wounds, and their medtech solutions

Wounds have many different sources, etiologies and forms and, therefore, demand a range of approaches. By virtue of these differences, they have considerably different costs. At the top of the list of wound culprits driving up cost is the category of chronic wounds. Simply put, these wounds are very slow to heal due to poor circulation at the site (e.g., decubitus stasis, or pressure, ulcers), concomitant health issues (diabetes) and the difficulty in changing the local environment toward one with conditions more conducive to the healing process.

Chronic wounds are not the most common — that is a category represented by surgical wounds, in which the wound has been created medically or surgically in order to excise or otherwise manage diseased tissue. But surgical wounds, traumatic wounds and lacerations are by their nature acute and, especially for surgical wounds, can be surgically managed to create clean wound edges, good vascularization and other conditions that accelerate healing. Therefore, while the volume of surgical and traumatic wounds and lacerations is significant, their costs are manageable and their growth is unremarkable.

But the costs of chronic wounds are higher due to both the types of different products required and the length of time required for those products to be used. Moreover, given the association of chronic wounds with conditions that are growing in prevalence due to increasing incidence of obesity, diabetes and other conditions, combined with an aging population that is increasingly sedentary, the prevalence of chronic wounds is shifting the balance among wound types. Below is the balance of wound types by prevalence worldwide in 2011, followed by the projected balance of wound types in 2025.

Worldwide Share of Wound Prevalence By Type, 2011

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Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S190 and Report #S249.

 

Worldwide Share of Wound Prevalence By Type, 2025

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Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S190 and Report #S249.

Surgical wounds offer the potential for use of devices which can ensure hemostasis, prevent internal adhesions and anastomoses, secure soft tissue, and close the skin. Traumatic wounds also offer potential for skin closure products and for hemostats, and adhesion prevention during post-trauma surgery. New wound-covering sealant products may also offer potential for treatment of cuts, grazes, and burns.

Chronic wounds are generally not amenable to treatment by adhesives, sealants and hemostats unless the wound has either been debrided to a sterile bleeding surface (in which case it becomes like a surgical wound), or the product offers some stimulant activity. Many hemostats exhibit some inflammatory and cytokinetic activity, which has been associated with accelerated healing. However, this inflammatory activity has also been known to burn the patient’s skin. Chronic wounds are instead dealt with often by a combination of debridement, frequent dressing changes, products to address local vascular circulation and pressure (negative and positive) and others. Progress is being made in reducing the associated healing times, but a large opportunity remains.

Aesthetic and Reconstructive Products Accelerating to Double Digit Growth Worldwide

Global medical aesthetic and reconstructive products, which include medical/surgical implants, materials, injectable products, energy-based devices (e.g., laser, RF), “cosmeceuticals” and other products used in aesthetic and/or reconstructive procedures, achieved sales of more than $6.5 billion in 2013. By 2018, the worldwide market for aesthetic/reconstructive products will reach $10.7 billion. The U.S. and the Latin America markets will have a CAGR close to 10%. The U.S. and Latin America will experience growth, respectively, of 9.2% and 10% in line with global trends. Of course, the global trend is largely represented by the U.S. market, which holds 45% of the total. Europe has been witnessing relatively a slower growth of 6.6% per year. Declining purchasing power, particularly in southern Europe affects the European market and this geographical segment is estimated at $1.84 billion in 2013 to reach $1.94 billion in 2018.

The Asia/Pacific region will have an overall CAGR of more than 14.1% driven by increasing demand and, accordingly, by the expanded access to technologies and products in China and by the continued high growth in the strong economies of Japan and South Korea. Overall, Asia will experience the strongest growth in aesthetic/reconstructive product sales, eventually eclipsing the total for the European market in 2018, reaching $2.24 billion. Globally, the growth of the market from 2013 and 2018 be a 10%+ compound annual growth rate.

Global Segmentation of All Surgical and Non-Surgical
Aesthetic/Reconstructive Procedures, 2013

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Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S710, “Global Markets for Products and Technologies in Aesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2013-2018″.

 

Sales of Sealants, Hemostasis, Other Closure a Large, Shifting Market Worldwide

Products that provide hemostasis, closure, sealing and anti-adhesion of wounds comprised long established products (e.g., tapes, sutures, etc.) as well as a variety of advanced products such as fibrin and other surgical sealants, surgical glues, hemostats and products to prevent post-surgical adhesion.  While traditional products are being innovated to keep pace with advanced products (for example, through the development of absorbable sutures), the shift of caseload and product sales away from traditional products appears unrelenting.

As a result, the balance of the competitive landscape is forecast to shift over the next few years toward advanced sealing, hemostasis, closure and anti-adhesion products.  Below is illustrated, in a combined “donut” chart, this shift from 2012 to 2017 in the share of the global market for these products.

sealants_donut_2012-2017

Source: MedMarket Diligence Report #S190, “Worldwide Surgical Sealants, Glues, Wound Closure and Anti-Adhesion Markets, 2012-2017.”

These percentage shifts may not seem significant unless one considers that the global market for these products is over $5 billion.

 

Potential for the Use of Hemostats, Sealants, Glues and Adhesion Prevention Products, Worldwide

The MedMarket Diligence Report #S190, “Worldwide Surgical Sealants, Glues, Wound Closure and Anti-Adhesion Markets, 2012-2017″, details the complete range of sealants & glues technologies used in traumatic, surgical and other wound closure, including tapes, sutures/staples/mechanical closure, hemostats, fibrin sealants/glues and medical adhesives and anti-adhesion products. The report details current clinical and technology developments, with data on products in development (detailing market status) and on the market; market size and forecast; competitor market shares; competitor profiles; and market opportunity. The report provides full year actual data from 2011. The report provides a worldwide forecast to 2017 of the markets for these technologies, with emphasis on the market impact of new technologies through the forecast period. The report provides specific forecasts and shares of the worldwide market by segment for Americas (detail for U.S., Rest of North America and Latin America), Europe (detail for United Kingdom, German, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of Europe), Asia/Pacific (detail for Japan, Korea, Rest of Asia/Pacific) and Rest of World. The report provides background data on the surgical, disease and traumatic wound patient populations targeted by current technologies and those under development, and the current clinical practices in the management of these patients, including the dynamics among the various clinical specialties or subspecialties vying for patient population and facilitating or limiting the growth of technologies. The report establish the current worldwide market size for major technology segments as a baseline for and projecting growth in the market through 2017. The report assesses and projects the composition of the market as technologies gain or lose relative market performance over this period. The report profiles 122 active companies in this industry, providing data on their current products, current market position and products under development.

See description, table of contents and list of exhibits at http://www.mediligence.com/rpt/rpt-s190.htm.