Medtech fundings for March 2017

Medtech fundings for March 2017 stand at $576 million, led by the $59 million IPO of Symetics, the $50 million Series C funding of Moximed, the $45 million funding of Corindus, the $40 million funding round of VertiFlex, and the $38 million funding of pig-to-human xenotransplant company eGenesis.

The complete list of fundings in medtech for March 2017 thus far are shown at link. Below are the top fundings for the month.

Source: Compiled by MedMarket Diligence, LLC

For a historical list of fundings by month since 2009, see link.

Medtech fundings for February 2017

Medtech fundings for February 2017 stand at $500.4 million, led by the $75 million credit facility secured by BioDelivery Sciences, the $45 million private placement by Corindus Vascular Robotics, the $41 million funding of Rhythm, Inc., the $37.2 million funding of Entellus Medical, and the $33 million funding of startup Surrozen.

Below are the top fundings for the month. For a complete list of fundings, see link.

Source: Compiled by MedMarket Diligence, LLC

For a historical listing of fundings in medtech, see link.

Investment in medtech and biotech: Outlook

Medtech and biotech investment is driven by an expectation of returns, but rapid advances in technology simultaneously drive excitement for their application while increasing the uncertainty in what is needed to bring those applications in the market.

MedMarket Diligence has tracked technology developments and trends in advanced medical technologies, inclusive of medical devices and the range of other technologies — in biotech, pharma, others — that impact, drive, limit, or otherwise affect markets for the management of disease and trauma. This broader perspective on new developments and a deeper understanding of their limitations is important for a couple of reasons:

  1. Healthcare systems and payers are demanding competitive cost and outcomes for specific patient populations, irrespective of technology type — it’s the endpoint that matters. This forces medical devices into de facto competition with biotech, pharma, and others.
  2. Medical devices are becoming increasingly intelligent medical devices, combining “smart” components, human-device interfaces, integration of AI in product development and products.
  3. Medical devices are rarely just “medical devices” anymore, often integrating embedded drugs, bioresorable materials, cell therapy components, etc.
  4. Many new technologies have dramatically pushed the boundaries on what medicine can potentially accomplish, from the personalized medicine enabled by genomics, these advances have served to create bigger gaps between scientific advance and commercial reality, demanding deeper understanding of the science.

The rapid pace of technology development across all these sectors and the increasing complexity of the underlying science are factors complicating the development, regulatory approval, and market introduction of advanced technologies. The unexpected size and number of the hurdles to bring these complex technologies to the market have been responsible for investment failures, such as:

  • Theranos. Investors were too ready to believe the disruptive ideas of its founder, Elizabeth Holmes. When it became clear that data did not support the technology, the value of the company plummeted.
  • Juno Therapeutics. The Seattle-based gene therapy company lost substantial share value after three patients died on a clinical trial for the company’s cell therapy treatments that were just months away from receiving regulatory approval in the US.
  • A ZS Associates study in 2016 showed that 81% of medtech companies struggle to receive an adequate return on investment

As a result, investment in biotech took a correctional hit in 2016 to deflate overblown expectations. Medtech, for its part, has seen declining investment, especially at early stages, reflecting an aversion to uncertainty in commercialization.

Below are clinical and technology areas that we see demonstrating growth and investment opportunity, but still represent challenges for executives to navigate their remaining development and commercialization obstacles:

  • Cell therapies
    • Parkinson’s disease
    • Type I diabetes
    • Arthritis
    • Burn victims
    • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Diabetes
    • Artificial pancreas
    • Non-invasive blood glucose measurement
  • Tissue engineering and regeneration
    • 3D printed organs
  • Brain-computer and other nervous system interfaces
    • Nerve-responsive prosthetics
    • Interfaces for patients with locked-in syndrome to communicate
    • Interfaces to enable (e.g., Stentrode) paralyzed patients to control devices
  • Robotics
    • Robotics in surgery (advancing, despite costs)
    • Robotic nurses
  • Optogenetics: light modulated nerve cells and neural circuits
  • Gene therapy
    • CRISPR
  • Localized drug delivery
  • Immuno-oncology
    • Further accelerated by genomics and computational approaches
    • Immune modulators, vaccines, adoptive cell therapies (e.g., CAR-T)
  • Drug development
    • Computational approaches to accelerate the evaluation of drug candidates
    • Organ-on-a-chip technologies to decrease the cost of drug testing

Impact on investment

  • Seed stage and Series A investment in med tech is down, reflecting an aversion to early stage uncertainty.
  • Acquisitions of early stage companies, by contrast, are up, reflecting acquiring companies to gain more control over the uncertainty
  • Need for critical insight and data to ensure patient outcomes at best costs
  • Costs of development, combined with uncertainty, demand that if the idea’s upside potential is only $10 million, then it’s time to find another idea
  • While better analysis of the hurdles to commercialization of advanced innovations will support investment, many medtech and biotech companies may opt instead for growth of established technologies into emerging markets, where the uncertainty is not science-based

 

Below is illustrated the fundings by category in 2015 and 2016, which showed a consistent drop from 2015 to 2016, driven by a widely acknowledged correction in biotech investment in 2016.

*For the sake of comparing other segments, the wound fundings above exclude the $1.8 billion IPO of Convatec in 2016.

Source: Compiled by MedMarket Diligence, LLC.

 

Medtech fundings in February 2017

Fundings in medical technology for the month of February stand at $148 million, led by the $37 million funding of Entellus Medical, followed by the $26 million funding of Viewray.

Below are the top fundings for the month thus far.

Source: Compiled by MedMarket Diligence, LLC.

For a complete list of fundings for the month, see link, and bookmark this post during February to see additional financings as they occur.

For a historical list of fundings, see link.

The best medtech investment opportunities

In reviewing patents, fundings, technology development trends, market development, and other hard data sources, we feel these are some of the strongest areas for investment in not only the medical device side of medtech, but also the broader biomedical technology arena:

  • Materials technologies
    • graphene
    • bioresorbables
    • biosensors
    • polymers
    • bioadhesives
  • Cell therapy and tissue engineering
    • cell-based treatments (diabetes, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury)
    • extracellular matrices in soft tissue repair and regeneration
  • Nanotechnology (subject of forthcoming report)
    • nano coatings
    • nano- and micromedical technologies for localized drug delivery
    • nanoparticles
  • 3D printing
    • prototype development
    • patient-specific implants
  • Minimally- and non-invasive technologies
    • transcatheter alternatives to surgery
    • NOTES (natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery)
  • Diabetes non-invasive glucose testing
  • Intraoperative surgical guidance
    • Cancer probes (e.g., fluorescent or optical coherence tomography, frozen section, cytologic imprint analysis, ultrasound, micro-computed tomography, near-infrared imaging, and spectroscopy)
  • neurostimulation and neuromodulation
  • point-of-care diagnostics
  • point-of-care imaging
  • AI-enhanced devices

In addition, there are many areas in healthcare in which there is much untapped demand with problems that, so far, seem to have eluded medtech solutions. These include infection control (Zika, MRSA, TB, nosocomial infections, etc.), chronic wound treatment (including decubitus/stasis/diabetic ulcers), type 2 diabetes and obesity.

 

Tracking Medtech Fundings in January 2017

Fundings for medtech in January 2017 stand at over $700 million, led thus far by the $55 million funding of Intuity Medical, the $54 million for Apollo Endosurgery, $50 million debt funding of ConforMIS, and the $50 million funding of Neuropace. Below are the top fundings for the month. For a complete list of fundings (to be updated during the month), see link.



Source: Compiled by MedMarket Diligence, LLC

For a historical list of fundings since 2009, see link.

 

Medtech fundings for December 2016

Medtech fundings for December 2016 stand at $905 million, led by the $397 million funding of Microbot Medical as part of its merger with StemCells and followed by the $206 million Series EE funding of Intarcia Therapeutics. Other key fundings include Astute Medical’s $43 million, and Femasys’ $37 million.

Below is a list of the top fundings for the month. For a complete list of fundings for the month, see link.

Source: Compiled by MedMarket Diligence, LLC

For a historical listing of fundings per month since 2009, see link.

Technologies at Recent Medtech Startups

Below is a list of the technologies under development at medical technology startups identified in October 2016 and included in the Medtech Startups Database:

  • Neuro-stimulation via patch.
  • Epinephrine auto-injector
  • Portable ultrasound device to detect the occurrence of strokes.
  • Medication adherence device to facilitate self-injection.
  • Diagnosis of malaria and sickle cell.
  • Implant devices to fight biofilms and infection.
  • Technologies to address infection and other risk in nursing protocols.
  • Electronic bone depth gauge for use in orthopedics.
  • Peripheral chronic total occlusion device.
  • Deep learning and artificial intelligence in point of care ultrasound.
  • Quantitative transmission ultrasound.

A historical listing of technologies at medtech startups (through January 2016).

Medtech Fundings for September 2016

Fundings in medical technology stand at $900 million for the month, led by the $345 million private placement by Insulet Corp., followed by the $168 million funding of Intarcia Therapeutics, the $86 million IPO of iRhythm Technologies, and the $75 million IPO of Obalon Therapeutics.

Below are the top fundings for the month thus far. Revisit this post (and refresh your browser) through September to see updates.

For the complete list of September 2016 fundings, see link.

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Source: Compiled by MedMarket Diligence, LLC.

For a historical list of medtech fundings by month since 2009, see link.

10 Facts About Medical Technologies that will Impress Your Friends

  1. In catheterization, a doctor can poke a hole in your leg and fix your heart.
  2. Radiosurgery can destroy a tumor and leave adjacent tissue untouched, touching the body only with energy.
  3. A doctor thousands of miles away can do surgery on you via telepresence and robotic instrumentation.
  4. Medical device implants like stents have been developed to simply dissolve over time.
  5. Doctors can see cancer via live imaging during operations to ensure that they excise it all.
  6. Type 1 diabetics may soon be able to so easily manage their condition, via combined insulin pump / glucometer that they may almost forget they have diabetes (or cell therapy may cure them!), while Type 2 diabetics will grow in number and cost to manage.
  7. Organs are already being printed, as are other tissue implants.
  8. Neuroprosthetics, exoskeletons and related technologies are enabling wheelchair-bound and other physically challenged people to walk upright, allowing amputees to control prosthetics with their mind,
  9. Almost two-thirds of the 7,000 medical device firms in the United States have fewer than 20 employees — Medtronic employs all the rest. (OK, that’s an exaggeration.)
  10. Science fiction continues to drive the imagination of medtech innovators. Decentralized diagnostics — very small, efficient devices in the hands of a doctor that will rapidly assist in diagnoses and expedite the process of intervention — are becoming pervasive, ideally embodied in the fictional “tricorder” in Star Trek.