Category Archives: ophthalmology

products, technologies and practices in the management of vision disorders and eye-related diseases

New Medical Technologies at Startups, September 2014

Below is a list of new technologies under development at medtech startups recently identified and included in the Medtech Startups Database:

  • Robotics for ophthalmic surgery.
  • Dynamic force generation for bone repair.
  • Neursurgical brain simulation system.
  • Orthopedic technologies including pedicle screw that does not require a guide wire.
  • Synthetic bone graft materials.
  • Minimally invasive mitral valve replacement.

For a historical listing of the technologies under development at medtech startups, see link.

New Technologies Under Development at Medtech Startups, August 2014

Below is a list of the technologies under development at newly identified medtech startups and included in the Medtech Startups Database.

  • Technology for the repair of rotator cuff tears.
  • Technologies for intravenous cannulation and phlebotomy, and an otorhinoscope.
  • Implant for the treatment of urinary incontinence.
  • LED (light) treatment of acute, dry macular degeneration.
  • Esophageal cooling device to manage patient temperature.
  • Surgical robotics.
  • Patient positioning system for orthopedic surgery.
  • Device to treat macular degeneration by delivering microcurrent to the eye.

For a historical listing of medtech startup technologies included in the database, see link.

Effective technologies for wound hemostasis, sealing and closure

See the pending 2014 Report #S192, “Worldwide Surgical Sealants, Glues, Wound Closure and Anti-Adhesion Markets, 2013-2020″.

Tourniquet, pressure and sutures have been used for controlling excessive bleeding during surgical procedures for many hundreds of years. Fibrin sealants represented a revolution in local hemostatic measures for both bleeding and nonbleeding disorders. Fibrin sealant has the potential to provide life-saving control of excessive bleeding in many critical surgical operations and during a number of elective procedures. The terms “sealant” and “glue” are frequently used interchangeably in the surgical context, but there is actually a difference in adhesive strength between sealants, pioneered by fibrin products (sometimes homemade) and the later, stronger glues of which cyanoacrylate-based products are the most common.

In order for a sealant to be effective, the product should meet several parameters, depending upon the application. Among these are:

  • Ability to close the wound
  • Strength of bond
  • Speed of curing
  • Protection of the wound from infection
  • Low surface friction
  • Breathability in order to aid healing
  • Lack of adverse side effects to skin and internal tissues
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Ease of handling

Fibrin and other sealant products have been approved and used outside the United States for many years and their use has created strong awareness of their surgical and economic benefits in Europe, Latin America and Asia. As a result, many such products have been marketed in these regions for 20 years or more, and have been developed for a variety of surgical uses. In the U.S., these products were initially approved as hemostatic adjuncts to suturing. They are increasingly being used for sealing of tissues, but their use beyond simple hemostasis (i.e., as sealants and low-strength glues) lags that of markets outside the U.S.

Despite the development of novel sutures (e.g., resorbable), endoscopically applied clips and other innovations, fibrin sealants will remain a versatile option available to surgeons to achieve hemostasis and sealing of wounds (alone or adjunctively with sutures/staples). Their clinical track record, biocompatibility and ready availability match high demand. Their limitation in adhesive strength, however, does put some limit on their sales potential, since significant demand exists for tight sealing and strong bonding of tissues under stress, such as in lung and bowel resections, cardiovascular and other anastomoses and adhesion of muscle, that go beyond what fibrin sealants can achieve. For this reason, other naturally-occuring “bioglues” are under development that will achieve tighter tissue bonds than fibrin sealants, but without the toxic effects of cyanoacrylates (“superglues”).

There are more than 30 companies worldwide developing fibrin sealants and driving a market that will exceed $2.2 billion by 2017.

sealants-regional-forecast

 Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S190. (This report is being updated by the pending 2014 Report #S192.)

For complete analysis of the global market for fibrin sealants, see the MedMarket Diligence Report #S190, “Worldwide Surgical Sealants, Glues, Wound Closure and Anti-Adhesion Markets, 2010-2017.”

Medical technologies and recently identified startups (June 2014)

New medical technologies under development at recently identified startups span ophthalmology, gastroenterology, cardiology, spine surgery, orthopedics, patient monitoring and surgical instrumentation.  Below are the technologies at the recently identified medtech startups that have been included in the Medtech Startups Database.

  • Intraocular lens for presbyopia.
  • Portable, wireless EKG device.
  • Tissue engineering in peripheral and central nervous system injury.
  • Micro transtympanic drug delivery to the ear.
  • Diagnosis of functional GI disorders.
  • Spinal implants and instrumentation systems.
  • Surgical suction devices.
  • Calcium phosphate bioceramic implants for bone defects.
  • Intervertebral fusion cage.
  • Monitoring of neural activity during sedation.
  • Surgical instrument positioning systems for minimally invasive and robotic surgery.
  • Critical care monitoring technologies.

For a historical listing of medical technologies under development at startups, see link.

Medtech fundings for June 2014

Fundings in medical technology for the month of June totaled $445 million, led by fundings of Benvenue Medical ($64 million) and InSightec ($50 million).

Below are the top fundings in the month.

Company funding Product/technology
Benvenue Medical, Inc., has raised $64 million in a round of funding according to the company Minimally invasive implants for spine surgery
InSightec, Inc., has raised $50 million in a Series D round of funding according to the company MR-guided focused ultrasound
Pixium Vision has raised $46.7 million in an initial public offering according to press reports Implants to treat blindness
OrthoPediatrics Corp. has raised $39 million in a round of funding according to a regulatory filing Orthopedic implant technologies designed for pediatric use
Cheetah Medical, Inc., has raised $33.85 million in a round of funding according to a regulatory filing Non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring
Spinal Kinetics, Inc., has raised $33.85 million of a planned $34.77 million round of funding according to a regulatory filing Motion preservation systems, including artificial discs, for degenerative disc disease

For a complete list of medtech fundings in June 2014, see link.

For a full list of the fundings in medtech, by month, since 2009, see link.

Technologies at Medtech Startups, May 2014

Below is a list of the new medical technologies under development at startups we identified in May 2014 and added to the Medtech Startups Database.

  • Patient positioning system for use in hip replacement and other orthopedic procedures.
  • Instrumentation to facilitate hip replacement surgery and other orthopedic instrumentation.
  • Drug-coated stent-valve designed to inhibit stenosis, obstruction or calcification of the valve.
  • Implants for the treatment of aneurysm.
  • Orthopedic implant technologies including a force sensor to measure performance of an orthopedic articular joint.
  • Insulin patch pump for treatment of insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes.
  • Undisclosed tissue vascular technology
  • Rapid, accurate, inexpensive diagnostic devices initially focused on malaria.
  • Device for diagnosis and management of diabetic retinopathy.
  • Tumor-targeted drug delivery.
  • Near infrared technology for blood glucose monitoring in diabetes.
  • Non-resorbable films for anti-adhesion.
  • Angioplasty double balloon for treatment of peripheral vascular disease.
  • Device to reduce the risk of ventilator-associated pneumonia.
  • Trocar, sleeve and tip for minimally invasive endoscopic surgery.

For a historical listing of the technologies at medtech startups, see link.

Where will medicine be 20 years from now?

My answer (edited) from this question on Quora.

I can speculate on this from the perspective of clinical practice and medical technology, but it should be first noted that another, important determinant of “where medicine will be” is the set of dynamics and forces behind healthcare delivery systems, including primarily the payment method, especially regarding reimbursement. It is clear that some form of reform in healthcare will result in a consolidation of the infrastructure paying for and managing patient populations. The infrastructure is bloated and expensive, unnecessarily adding to costs that neither the federal government nor individuals can sustain. This is not to say that I predict movement to a single payer system — that is just one perceived solution to the problem. There are far too many costs in healthcare that offer no benefits in terms of quality; indeed, such costs are a true impediment to quality. Funds that go to infrastructure (insurance companies and other intermediaries and the demands they put on healthcare delivery work directly against quality of care. So, whether it is Obamacare, a single payer system, state administered healthcare (exchanges) or some other as-yet-unidentified form, there will be change in how healthcare is delivered from a cost/management perspective.

From the clinical practice and technology side, there will be enormous changes to healthcare. Here are examples of what I see from tracking trends in clinical practice and medical technology development:

  • Cancer 5 year survival rates will, for many cancers, be well over 90%. Cancer will largely be transformed in most cases to chronic disease that can be effectively managed by surgery, immunology, chemotherapy and other interventions.
  • Diabetes Type 1 (juvenile onset) will be managed in most patients by an “artificial pancreas”, a closed loop glucometer and insulin pump that will self-regulate blood glucose levels. OR, stem cell or other cell therapies may well achieve success in restoring normal insulin production and glucose metabolism in Type 1 patients. The odds are better that a practical, affordable artificial pancreas will developed than stem or other cell therapy, but both technologies are moving aggressively and will gain dramatic successes within 20 years.
  • Diabetes Type 2 (adult onset) will be a significant problem governed by different dynamics than Type 1. A large body of evidence will exist that shows dramatically reduced incidence of Type 2 associated with obesity management (gastric bypass, satiety drugs, etc.) that will mitigate the growing prevalence of Type 2, but research into pharmacologic or other therapies may at best achieve only modest advances. The problem will reside in the complexity of different Type 2 manifestation, the late onset of the condition in patients who are resistant to the necessary changes in lifestyle and the global epidemic that will challenge dissemination of new technologies and clinical practices to third world populations.
  • Cell therapy and tissue engineering will offer an enormous number of solutions for conditions currently treated inadequately, if at all. Below is an illustration of the range of applications currently available or in development, a list that will expand (along with successes in each) over the next 20 years.
  • Gene therapy will be an option for a majority of genetically-based diseases (especially inherited diseases) and will offer clinical options for non-inherited conditions. Advances in the analysis of inheritance and expression of genes will also enable advanced interventions to either ameliorate or actually preempt the onset of genetic disease.
  • Drug development will be dramatically more sophisticated, reducing the development time and cost while resulting in drugs that are far more clinically effective (and less prone to side effects). This arises from drug candidates being evaluated via distributed processing systems (or quantum computer systems) that can predict efficacy and side effect without need of expensive and exhaustive animal or human testing.
  • Most surgical procedures will achieve the ability to be virtually non-invasive. Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery will enable highly sophisticated surgery without ever making an abdominal or other (external) incision. Technologies like “gamma knife” and similar will have the ability to destroy tumors or ablate pathological tissue via completely external, energy-based systems.
  • Information technology will radically improve patient management. Very sophisticated electronic patient records will dramatically improve patient care via reduction of contraindications, predictive systems to proactively manage disease and disease risk, and greatly improve the decision-making of physicians tasked with diagnosing and treating patients.
  • Systems biology will underlie the biology of most future medical advances in the next 20 years. Systems biology is a discipline focused on an integrated understanding of cell biology, physiology, genetics, chemistry, and a wide range of other individual medical and scientific disciplines. It represents an implicit recognition of an organism as an embodiment of multiple, interdependent organ systems and its processes, such that both pathology and wellness are understood from the perspective of the sum total of both the problem and the impact of possible solutions.


There will be many more unforeseen medical advances achieved within 20 years, many arising from research that may not even be imagined yet. However, the above advances are based on actual research and/or the advances that have already arisen from that research.