The Demand for Sealants, Glues, and Hemostats in 2016

The following is drawn from “Worldwide Markets for Medical and Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Hemostats, 2015-2022.” Report #S290.

The need for surgical sealants, glues and hemostats is directly related to the clinical caseload and procedure volumes, as well as to the adoption of these products for multiple uses, such as the use of one product for sealing, hemostasis and anti-adhesion. It is fair to say that use of these products has become routine in the surgical suite and in other clinical locations. Procedure volumes are in turn driven by demographic forces, including global aging populations, while regulatory changes will continue to influence uptake of these products.

wound-prevalance

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290.

Medical Sealants

Fibrin sealants are made of a combination of thrombin and fibrinogen. These sealants may be sprayed on the bleeding surface, or applied using a patch. Surgical sealants might be made of glutaraldehyde and bovine serum albumin, polyethylene glycol polymers, and cyanoacrylates.

Sealants are most often used to stop bleeding over a large area. If the surgeon wishes to fasten down a flap without using sutures, or in addition to using sutures, then the product used is usually a medical glue.

Hemostatic Products

The surgeon and the perioperative nurse have a variety of hemostats from which to choose, as they are not all alike in their applications and efficacy. Selection of the most appropriate hemostat requires training and experience, and can affect the clinical outcome, as well as decrease treatment costs. Some of the factors that enter into the decision-making process include the size of the wound, the amount of hemorrhaging, potential adverse effects, whether the procedure is MIS or open surgery, and others.

Active hemostats contain thrombin products which may be derived from several sources, such as bovine pooled plasma purification, human pooled plasma purification, or through human recombinant manufacturing processes. Flowable-type hemostats are made of a granular bovine or porcine gelatin that is combined with saline or reconstituted thrombin, forming a flowable putty that may be applied to the bleeding area.

Medical Glues

Sealants and glues are terms which are often used interchangeably, which can be confusing. In this report, a medical glue is defined as a product used to bond two surfaces together securely. Surgeons are increasingly reaching for medical glues to either help secure a suture line, or to replace sutures entirely in the repair of soft tissues. Medical glues are also utilized in repairing bone fractures, especially for highly comminuted fractures that often involve many small fragments. This helps to spread out the force-bearing surface, rather than focusing weight-bearing on spots where a pin has been inserted.

Thus, the surgeon has a fairly wide array of products from which to choose. The choice of which surgical hemostat or sealant to use depends on several factors, including the procedure being conducted, the type of bleeding, severity of the hemorrhage, the surgeon’s experience with the products, the surgeon’s preference, the price of the product and availability at the time of surgery. For example, a product which has a long shelf life and does not require refrigeration or other special storage, and which requires no special preparation, usually holds advantages over a product which must be mixed before use, or held in a refrigerator during storage, then allowed to warm up to room temperature before use.

 

USA and Asia/Pacific Size Versus Growth in Sealants, Glues, Hemostats

The market dynamics in Asia/Pacific stand apart from those in the U.S. In the case of surgical sealants, glues, and hemostats, what stands out is the Size versus Growth metric.

Much of the potential in China, in particular, remains untapped (low volume, high growth), while in the U.S., these markets are more well established and, therefore, more penetrated.

Below are the size/growth “bubbles” for, alternating, the U.S. and Asia/Pacific.

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Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290.

Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures, Technologies Trended Globally to 2022

cardiovascular procedures

Global Dynamics of Surgical and Interventional Cardiovascular Procedures, 2015-2022. See Report #C500.

Publishing July 2016

This report covers surgical and interventional therapeutic procedures commonly used in the management of acute and chronic conditions affecting myocardium and vascular system. The latter include ischemic heart disease (and its life threatening manifestations like AMI, cardiogenic shock, etc.); heart failure; structural heart disorders (valvular abnormalities and congenital heart defects); peripheral artery disease (and limb and life threatening critical limb ischemia); aortic disorders (AAA, TAA and aortic dissections); acute and chronic venous conditions (such as deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and chronic venous insufficiency); neurovascular pathologies associated with high risk of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke (such as cerebral aneurysms and AVMs, and high-grade carotid/intracranial stenosis); and cardiac rhythm disorders (requiring correction with implantable pulse generators/IPG or arrhythmia ablation).

The report offers current assessment and projected procedural dynamics (2015 to 2022) for primary market geographies (e.g., United States, Largest Western European Countries, and Major Asian States) as well as the rest-of-the-world.

See the complete table of contents at Report C500.

 

 

Where is the medtech growth?

Medical technology is, for many of its markets, being forced to look for growth from more sources, including emerging markets. Manufacturers are able to gain better margins through innovation, but their success varies by clinical application.

Cardiology. A demanding patient base (it’s life or death). Be that as it may, there are few new or untapped markets, only the opportunity for new technologies to displace existing markets. Interventional technologies are progressively enabling treatment of larger patient populations, but much growth will still be from emerging markets.

Wound management. Even the most well-established markets will see growth from innovation. The wound market just needs less growth to be happy, since small percentage growth becomes very large by volume. And yet, some of the most significant growth in the long run will be for more advanced

Surgery. Every aspect of surgery seems to be subject to attempts to improve upon it. Robotics, endoscopy, transcatheter, single-port, incisionless, natural orifice. Interventional options are increasing the treatable patient population, and it seems likely that continued development (e.g., materials, including biodegradables, use of drug or other coatings, including cells) will yield more routine procedures for more and different types of conditions, many of which have been inadequately served, if it all.

Orthopedics. Aging populations demanding more agility and mobility will drive orthopedic procedures and device use. Innovation still represents some upside, but more from 3D printing than other new technologies being introduced to practice.

Tissue/Cell Therapy. This is a technology opportunity (and represents radical innovation for most clinical areas), but it is also a set of target clinical applications, since tissues/cells are being engineered to address tissue or cell trauma or disease. Growth is displacing existing markets with new technology, such as bioengineered skin, tendons, bladders, bone, cardiac tissue, etc. These are fundamentally radical technologies for the target applications.

Below is my conceptual opinion on the balance of growth by clinical area coming from routine innovation (tweaks, improvements), radical innovation (whole new “paradigms” like cell therapy in cardiology), and emerging market growth (e.g., China, S. America).

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Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC.

Growth in Advance Wound Care Product Revenues, 2014 to 2024

Even excluding the three traditional wound care dressing segments, the advanced wound care market is enormous — over the next ten years, it will grow at a compound annual growth rate of at least 7.7%, and is forecast to reach nearly $16 billion by 2024. This market is being driven by several inter-related factors: the increasing percentage of the aged (65years old and over) in country populations, the fact that people are living longer, obesity, the virtually epidemic rise of Type 2 diabetes, government policies intended to curb healthcare spending, and an increasingly sedentary population. The latter trend is seen especially in developed countries, but is also on the rise in less-developed countries as their economic standing improves and the middle class grows in numbers.

Certain product segments are forecast to have stronger growth than others. Sales of bioengineered skin & skin substitutes for wound care will increase at a CAGR of at least 15%, while sales of foam and hydrocolloid dressings will be growing at high single-digit rates, respectively.

Advance Wound Care Product Revenues, 2014 to 2024

Wound 2014 and 2024

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S251.

Venous and Arterial Stents in Peripheral Vascular Applications

In the February 2016 report #V201, “Global Market Opportunities in Peripheral Arterial and Venous Stents, Forecast to 2020”, we detail the markets for peripheral stents in the management of the most prevalent occlusive circulatory disorders and other pathologies affecting the abdominal and thoracic aortic tree and lower extremity arterial bed.

Stents are also increasingly used in the management of the debilitating conditions like venous outflow obstruction associated with deep venous thrombosis and chronic venous insufficiency.

Globally, peripheral stenting procedures for arterial indications, as in abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysm, are growing around 6% annually, while venous procedures are a little higher. More noteworthy is the actual shifts of the market as the slowing, but still relentless, growth in China and elsewhere in Asia-Pacific region is actually changing the balance of markets, and in fact will become the dominant market for peripheral arterial stents by 2020

Periph stent px arterial

Note: Proprietary data obscured.
Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #V201.

In the less well developed venous stenting arena, the U.S. and Europe still represent the largest share of the market, and will do so through 2020.

Screen Shot 2016-03-18 at 2.40.34 PM

Note: Proprietary data obscured.
Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #V201.

Bioengineered skin displacing traditional wound management products

Very decided shifts are taking place in the wound management market as advanced wound technologies take up caseload from traditional technologies like gauze and others. It becomes evident that traditional products once representing above average sales are now projected to be below average (gauze) as are even a moderately new technology, “negative pressure wound therapy devices” (NPWD), while bioengineered skin and skin substitutes will represent “above average”.

Global Wound Management Market,
Above/Below Average Sectors, 2015 & 2024

Screen-Shot-2016-03-16-at-8.02.29-AM

Source: Report #S251.

Global Wound Management Market, Sales, 2015 & 2024

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Source: Report #S251.

Despite the tepid growth of traditional wound management products, they remain very large markets that even the most aggressively growing segments will require time to match that volume. Bioengineered skin and skin substitutes are moving fast in that direction.

Global CAGR 2016-2024 for Wound Management Segments

Screen-Shot-2016-03-16-at-8.09.10-AM

Source: Report #S251.

If you would like excerpts from this report, Click Here.

Wound Markets East and West: A Comparison?

Placed on the same scale, U.S. markets for wound management technologies do not seem starkly different from those in the Asia/Pacific region, with insignificant differences, now and in the future, in the balance of different technologies used.

Screen Shot 2016-03-07 at 8.50.43 AMScreen Shot 2016-03-07 at 8.50.55 AM

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S251.

However, one cannot really compare the U.S. and Asia/Pacific on the “same scale” without seeing the obvious differences:

Screen Shot 2016-03-07 at 8.49.54 AMScreen Shot 2016-03-07 at 8.50.28 AM

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S251. If you would like excerpts from this report, Click Here.