USA and Asia/Pacific Size Versus Growth in Sealants, Glues, Hemostats

The market dynamics in Asia/Pacific stand apart from those in the U.S. In the case of surgical sealants, glues, and hemostats, what stands out is the Size versus Growth metric.

Much of the potential in China, in particular, remains untapped (low volume, high growth), while in the U.S., these markets are more well established and, therefore, more penetrated.

Below are the size/growth “bubbles” for, alternating, the U.S. and Asia/Pacific.

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Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290.

Recent Merger and Acquisition Activity in Sealants, Glues and Hemostats

Growth in sealants, glues, and hemostats markets has been strong enough for long enough to have attracted a lot of players. With growth slowing as the untapped potential is reducing more rapidly, consolidation has now appeared in the natural order of things.

Recent Merger and Acquisition Activity in Sealants, Glues and Hemostats

Original Company/ ProductAcquiring or Collaborating CompanyDate of Acquisition/Collaboration DealFinancial Details (where revealed)
Bristol-Myers Squibb/ Recothrom¨ Thrombin topical hemostatThe Medicines Company2012/2014$105 million collaboration fee
Cohera Medical/TissuGlu¨Collaboration with B. Braun Surgical S.A. to distribute in Germany, Spain and Portugal.Jan. 2015B. Braun Surgical S.A. will exclusively market and sell TissuGlu in the territories of Germany, Spain and Portugal through its existing Closure Technologies commercial teams.
Profibrix/ FibroCapsThe Medicines Company2013$90 million, with $140 million contingent upon milestones
Medafor/Arista¨ AH Absorbable Hemostatic ParticlesCR Bard (Bard Davol)2013$200 million upfront payment
Tenaxis Medical, with ArterX (among other products)The Medicines Company2014$58 million in upfront payments
The Medicines Company/ PreveLeakª (formerly known as ArterX), Raplixaª(formerly known as FibroCaps) fibrin sealant, Recothrom¨ Thrombin topical (Recombinant) sealantMallinckrodt plc2016The entire deal has a potential value of $410 million.
Xcede Technologies, Inc./Resorbable Hemostatic PatchCollaboration with Cook BiotechJan-16Signed three collaboration agreements with Cook Biotech, including a Development Agreement, a License Agreement and a Supply Agreement to complete development, seek regulatory clearance and produce XcedeÕs resorbable hemostatic patch.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290.

To request a set of report excerpts, click here.

Fibrin, Thrombin, Collagen and Gelatin-Based Sealants, 2016 & 2022

fibrin2016

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290 (July 2016).

fibrin2022

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290 (July 2016).

collagen2016

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290 (July 2016).

collagen2022

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290 (July 2016).

Where is the medtech growth?

Medical technology is, for many of its markets, being forced to look for growth from more sources, including emerging markets. Manufacturers are able to gain better margins through innovation, but their success varies by clinical application.

Cardiology. A demanding patient base (it’s life or death). Be that as it may, there are few new or untapped markets, only the opportunity for new technologies to displace existing markets. Interventional technologies are progressively enabling treatment of larger patient populations, but much growth will still be from emerging markets.

Wound management. Even the most well-established markets will see growth from innovation. The wound market just needs less growth to be happy, since small percentage growth becomes very large by volume. And yet, some of the most significant growth in the long run will be for more advanced

Surgery. Every aspect of surgery seems to be subject to attempts to improve upon it. Robotics, endoscopy, transcatheter, single-port, incisionless, natural orifice. Interventional options are increasing the treatable patient population, and it seems likely that continued development (e.g., materials, including biodegradables, use of drug or other coatings, including cells) will yield more routine procedures for more and different types of conditions, many of which have been inadequately served, if it all.

Orthopedics. Aging populations demanding more agility and mobility will drive orthopedic procedures and device use. Innovation still represents some upside, but more from 3D printing than other new technologies being introduced to practice.

Tissue/Cell Therapy. This is a technology opportunity (and represents radical innovation for most clinical areas), but it is also a set of target clinical applications, since tissues/cells are being engineered to address tissue or cell trauma or disease. Growth is displacing existing markets with new technology, such as bioengineered skin, tendons, bladders, bone, cardiac tissue, etc. These are fundamentally radical technologies for the target applications.

Below is my conceptual opinion on the balance of growth by clinical area coming from routine innovation (tweaks, improvements), radical innovation (whole new “paradigms” like cell therapy in cardiology), and emerging market growth (e.g., China, S. America).

Screen Shot 2016-06-22 at 1.56.13 PM

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC.

Sealants, Glues, Hemostats to 2022

 

Below is our bubble chart giving the segment size (bubble size and horizontal axis position) and growth (vertical axis position) of the products detailed in our 2014 report #S192.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S192 (published Oct. 2014)

Given the interest by companies actively involved in sealants, glues, and hemostats, we are publishing Report #S290 (June 2016), “Worldwide Markets for Medical and Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Hemostats, 2015-2022.”

From Skitch

What is the ideal wound product?

The previously accepted wisdom was that a wound healed best when it was kept as dry as possible. In 1962, George Winter, a British-born physician, published his ground-breaking wound care research. His paper, (Nature 193:293. 1962), entitled, “Formation of the scab and the rate of epithelization of superficial wounds in the skin of the young domestic pig,” demonstrated that wounds kept moist healed faster than those exposed to the air or covered with a traditional dressing and kept dry. Dr. Winter’s work began the development of modern wound dressings which are used to promote moist wound healing.

Natural skin is considered the ideal wound dressing, and therefore wound dressings have been designed to try to reproduce the advantages of natural skin. Today, experts feel that a wound dressing should have several characteristics if it is to serve its purpose. A wound dressing should:

  • Provide the optimal moisture needs for the particular wound
  • Have the capacity to provide thermal insulation, gaseous exchange, and to help drainage and debris removal, which promotes tissue reconstruction
  • Be biocompatible without causing any allergic or immune response reaction
  • Protect the wound from secondary infections
  • Be easily removable without causing any trauma to the delicate healing tissues.

There are hundreds of dressings to choose from, but they all fall into one of a few categories. The healthcare provider will select a dressing by category, according to availability and familiarity of using that particular dressing.

Occlusive dressings are those which are air- and water-tight. An occlusive dressing is frequently made with some kind of waxy coating to ensure a totally water-tight bandage. It may also consist of a thin sheet of plastic affixed to the skin with tape. An occlusive dressing retains moisture, heat, body fluids and medication in the wound. There are several types of occlusive dressings, which are discussed below.

It should be remembered that proper wound care, especially of a chronic wound, is a complex process, as much art as science; a trained healthcare provider assesses the wound as it goes through various stages, and applies the appropriate wound dressings as the need arises. Unfortunately, the most appropriate dressing is not always used, due perhaps to confusion around which type of dressing to apply, or because certain dressings—especially advanced dressings—either may not be available in the facility, or may not be reimbursed by the country’s healthcare system, or may simply be too expensive. This remains true even in some of the developed countries.

The following table summarizes potential applications for various types of wound care products, with selected examples. This summary is meant as a guideline and an illustration of the fact that different dressing types may find use in various types of wounds. In addition, as a wound heals, it may need a different type of dressing. Here again the wound care professional’s judgment and training come into play.

Dressing categoryProduct examplesDescriptionPotential applications
FilmHydrofilm, Release, Tegaderm, BioclusiveComes as adhesive, thin transparent polyurethane film, and as a dressing with a low adherent pad attached to the film.Clean, dry wounds, minimal exudate; also used to cover and secure underlying absorptive dressing, and on hard-to-bandage locations, such as heel.
FoamPermaFoam, PolyMem, BiatainPolyurethane foam dressing available in sheets or in cavity filling shapes. Some foam dressing have a semipermeable, waterproof layer as the outer layer of the dressingFacilitates a moist wound environment for healing. Used to clean granulating wounds which have minimal exudate.
HydrogelHydrosorb Gel Sheet, Purilon, Aquasorb, DuoDerm, Intrasite Gel, Granugel,Colloids which consist of polymers that expand in water. Available in gels, sheets, hydrogel-impregnated dressings.Provides moist wound environment for cell migration, reduces pain, helps to rehydrate eschar. Used on dry, sloughy or necrotic wounds.
HydrocolloidCombiDERM, Hydrocoll, Comfeel, DuoDerm CGF Extra Thin, Granuflex, TegasorbÕ Nu-DermMade of hydroactive or hydrophilic particles attached to a hydrophobic polymer. The hydrophilic particles absorb moisture from the wound, convert it to a gel at the interface with the wound. Conforms to wound surface; waterproof and bacteria proof.Gel formation at wound interface provides moist wound environment. Dry necrotic wounds, or for wounds with minimal exudate. Also used for granulating wounds.
AlginateAlgiSite, Sorbalgon Curasorb, Kaltogel, Kaltostat, SeaSorb, TegagelA natural polysaccharide derived from seaweed; available in a range of sizes, as well as in ribbons and ropes.Because highly absorbent, used for wounds with copious exudate. Can be used in rope form for packing exudative wound cavities or sinus tracts.
AntimicrobialBiatain Ag, Atrauman Ag, MediHoneyBoth silver and honey are used as antimicrobial elements in dressings.Silver: Requires wound to be moderately exudative to activate the silver, in order to be effective
NPWDSNaP, V.A.C. Ulta, PICO, Renasys (not in USA), Prospera PRO series, Invia LibertyComputerized vacuum device applies continuous or intermittent negative or sub-atmospheric pressure to the wound surface. NPWT accelerates wound healing, reduces time to wound closure. Comes in both stationary and portable versions.May be used for traumatic acute wound, open amputations, open abdomen, etc. Seems to increase burn wound perfusion. Also used in management of DFUs. Contraindicated for arterial insufficiency ulcers. Not to be used if necrotic tissue is present in over 30% of the wound.
Bioengineered Skin and Skin SubstitutesAlloDerm, AlloMax, FlexHD, DermACELL, DermaMatrix, DermaPure, Graftjacket Regenerative Tissue Matrix, PriMatrix, SurgiMend PRS, Strattice Reconstructive Tissue Matrix, Permacol, EpiFix, OASIS Wound Matrix, Apligraf, Dermagraft, Integra Dermal Regeneration Template, TransCyteBio-engineered skin and soft tissue substitutes may be derived from human tissue (autologous or allogeneic), xenographic, synthetic materials, or a composite of these materials.Burns, trauma wounds, DFUs, VLUs, pressure ulcers, postsurgical breast reconstruction, bullous diseases

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S251.

Medtech midterm; Cardiovascular procedures; Wound shifts; Fundings

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From MedMarket Diligence, LLC
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From “Medtech is Dead. Long Live Medtech“, here is some of what we can expect in the next 5-10 years in medtech:

  • Type 1 diabetes gradually becomes less burdensome, with fewer complications, and improved quality of life for patients.
  • Type 2 diabetes continues to plague Western markets in particular, despite advances in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring due to challenges in patient compliance.
  • Cancer five year survival rates will dramatically increase for many cancers. The number of hits on Google searches for “cure AND cancer” will reflect this.
  • Multifaceted approaches available for treatment of traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury – encompassing exoskeletons to help retrain/rehabilitate and increase functional mobility, nerve grafting, cell/tissue therapy, and others.
  • Organ/device hybrids will proliferate and become viable alternatives to transplant, or bridge-to-transplant, for pulmonary assist, kidney, liver, heart, pancreas and other organ.
  • Stem cells have had dramatic success, and the science will have improved, but challenges remain, especially since the excitement around stem and other pluripotent cells has created a climate not far removed from the wild west – the potential of such open territory being up for grabs has drawn hordes of activity, not all in the best interests of patients or shareholders. But in this time frame, specific treatments will likely have become standards of care for some diseases, while the challenge and opportunity remain for many others.
From “Global Dynamics of Surgical and Interventional Cardiovascular Procedures, 2015-2022”.

Cardiovascular Surgical and Interventional Procedures

  • Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery
  • Coronary Mechanical and Laser Atherectomy
  • Coronary Angioplasty and Stenting
  • Mechanical Thrombectomy
  • Ventricular Assist Device Placement
  • Total Artificial Heart
  • Donor Heart Transplantation
  • Lower Extremity Arterial Bypass Surgery
  • Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty (PTA) and Bare Metal Stenting
  • PTA and Drug-Eluting Stenting
  • PTA with Drug-Eluting Balloons
  • Mechanical and Laser Atherectomy
  • Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis and Thrombectomy
  • Surgical and Endovascular Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair
  • Surgical and Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair
  • Vena Cava Filter Placement
  • Endovenous Ablation
  • Venous Revascularization
  • Carotid Endarterectomy
  • Carotid Artery Stenting
  • Cerebral Thrombectomy
  • Cerebral Aneurysm and Arteriovenous Malformation (AVM) repair
  • Congenital Heart Defect Repair
  • Heart Valve Repair and Replacement Surgery
  • Transcatheter Valve Repair and Replacement
  • Pacemaker Implantation
  • Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Placement
  • Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device Placement
  • Standard SVT Ablation
  • Surgical AFIb Ablation
  • Transcatheter AFib Ablation

See Report #C500, published August 2016.

From “Worldwide Wound Management, Forecast to 2024”, Report #S251, published December 2015

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Source: Report #S251.

 

Selected Medtech Fundings, May 2016

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Source: Compiled by MedMarket Diligence, LLC

Pending Reports from MedMarket Diligence:

  • Global Nanomedical Technologies, Markets and Opportunities, 2016-2021. Details.
  • Global Dynamics of Surgical and Interventional Cardiovascular Procedures, 2015-2022. Details.
  • Worldwide Markets for Medical and Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Hemostats, 2015-2022. Details.

Patrick Driscoll
(patrick)
MedMarket Diligence