Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures, Technologies Trended Globally to 2022

cardiovascular procedures

Global Dynamics of Surgical and Interventional Cardiovascular Procedures, 2015-2022. See Report #C500.

Publishing July 2016

This report covers surgical and interventional therapeutic procedures commonly used in the management of acute and chronic conditions affecting myocardium and vascular system. The latter include ischemic heart disease (and its life threatening manifestations like AMI, cardiogenic shock, etc.); heart failure; structural heart disorders (valvular abnormalities and congenital heart defects); peripheral artery disease (and limb and life threatening critical limb ischemia); aortic disorders (AAA, TAA and aortic dissections); acute and chronic venous conditions (such as deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and chronic venous insufficiency); neurovascular pathologies associated with high risk of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke (such as cerebral aneurysms and AVMs, and high-grade carotid/intracranial stenosis); and cardiac rhythm disorders (requiring correction with implantable pulse generators/IPG or arrhythmia ablation).

The report offers current assessment and projected procedural dynamics (2015 to 2022) for primary market geographies (e.g., United States, Largest Western European Countries, and Major Asian States) as well as the rest-of-the-world.

See the complete table of contents at Report C500.

 

 

Abbott’s fully-absorbing stent gets FDA nod

AbsorbOUS-heroAbbott’s resorbable coronary stent, Absorb, gained FDA regulatory approval today, the first for a fully-dissolving coronary stent. Designed to be fully resorbed by the body within three years of implantation, the device is intended to achieve the endpoint of a more natural vasculature than can be achieved with metal stents.


In July 2016, MedMarket Diligence is publishing, “Global Dynamics of Surgical and Interventional Cardiovascular Procedures, 2015-2022”, Report #C500.

Fibrin, Thrombin, Collagen and Gelatin-Based Sealants, 2016 & 2022

fibrin2016

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290 (July 2016).

fibrin2022

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290 (July 2016).

collagen2016

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290 (July 2016).

collagen2022

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S290 (July 2016).

Where is the medtech growth?

Medical technology is, for many of its markets, being forced to look for growth from more sources, including emerging markets. Manufacturers are able to gain better margins through innovation, but their success varies by clinical application.

Cardiology. A demanding patient base (it’s life or death). Be that as it may, there are few new or untapped markets, only the opportunity for new technologies to displace existing markets. Interventional technologies are progressively enabling treatment of larger patient populations, but much growth will still be from emerging markets.

Wound management. Even the most well-established markets will see growth from innovation. The wound market just needs less growth to be happy, since small percentage growth becomes very large by volume. And yet, some of the most significant growth in the long run will be for more advanced

Surgery. Every aspect of surgery seems to be subject to attempts to improve upon it. Robotics, endoscopy, transcatheter, single-port, incisionless, natural orifice. Interventional options are increasing the treatable patient population, and it seems likely that continued development (e.g., materials, including biodegradables, use of drug or other coatings, including cells) will yield more routine procedures for more and different types of conditions, many of which have been inadequately served, if it all.

Orthopedics. Aging populations demanding more agility and mobility will drive orthopedic procedures and device use. Innovation still represents some upside, but more from 3D printing than other new technologies being introduced to practice.

Tissue/Cell Therapy. This is a technology opportunity (and represents radical innovation for most clinical areas), but it is also a set of target clinical applications, since tissues/cells are being engineered to address tissue or cell trauma or disease. Growth is displacing existing markets with new technology, such as bioengineered skin, tendons, bladders, bone, cardiac tissue, etc. These are fundamentally radical technologies for the target applications.

Below is my conceptual opinion on the balance of growth by clinical area coming from routine innovation (tweaks, improvements), radical innovation (whole new “paradigms” like cell therapy in cardiology), and emerging market growth (e.g., China, S. America).

Screen Shot 2016-06-22 at 1.56.13 PM

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC, opinion!

Sealants, Glues, Hemostats to 2022

 

Below is our bubble chart giving the segment size (bubble size and horizontal axis position) and growth (vertical axis position) of the products detailed in our 2014 report #S192.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S192 (published Oct. 2014)

Given the interest by companies actively involved in sealants, glues, and hemostats, we are publishing Report #S290 (June 2016), “Worldwide Markets for Medical and Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Hemostats, 2015-2022.”

From Skitch

Medtech midterm; Cardiovascular procedures; Wound shifts; Fundings

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advanced medical technologies

A weekly(ish) newsletter to our blog subscribers.
From MedMarket Diligence, LLC
(Make note of this code: “Optinthirtyoff”)

From “Medtech is Dead. Long Live Medtech“, here is some of what we can expect in the next 5-10 years in medtech:

  • Type 1 diabetes gradually becomes less burdensome, with fewer complications, and improved quality of life for patients.
  • Type 2 diabetes continues to plague Western markets in particular, despite advances in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring due to challenges in patient compliance.
  • Cancer five year survival rates will dramatically increase for many cancers. The number of hits on Google searches for “cure AND cancer” will reflect this.
  • Multifaceted approaches available for treatment of traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury – encompassing exoskeletons to help retrain/rehabilitate and increase functional mobility, nerve grafting, cell/tissue therapy, and others.
  • Organ/device hybrids will proliferate and become viable alternatives to transplant, or bridge-to-transplant, for pulmonary assist, kidney, liver, heart, pancreas and other organ.
  • Stem cells have had dramatic success, and the science will have improved, but challenges remain, especially since the excitement around stem and other pluripotent cells has created a climate not far removed from the wild west – the potential of such open territory being up for grabs has drawn hordes of activity, not all in the best interests of patients or shareholders. But in this time frame, specific treatments will likely have become standards of care for some diseases, while the challenge and opportunity remain for many others.
From “Global Dynamics of Surgical and Interventional Cardiovascular Procedures, 2015-2022”.

Cardiovascular Surgical and Interventional Procedures

  • Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery
  • Coronary Mechanical and Laser Atherectomy
  • Coronary Angioplasty and Stenting
  • Mechanical Thrombectomy
  • Ventricular Assist Device Placement
  • Total Artificial Heart
  • Donor Heart Transplantation
  • Lower Extremity Arterial Bypass Surgery
  • Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty (PTA) and Bare Metal Stenting
  • PTA and Drug-Eluting Stenting
  • PTA with Drug-Eluting Balloons
  • Mechanical and Laser Atherectomy
  • Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis and Thrombectomy
  • Surgical and Endovascular Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair
  • Surgical and Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair
  • Vena Cava Filter Placement
  • Endovenous Ablation
  • Venous Revascularization
  • Carotid Endarterectomy
  • Carotid Artery Stenting
  • Cerebral Thrombectomy
  • Cerebral Aneurysm and Arteriovenous Malformation (AVM) repair
  • Congenital Heart Defect Repair
  • Heart Valve Repair and Replacement Surgery
  • Transcatheter Valve Repair and Replacement
  • Pacemaker Implantation
  • Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Placement
  • Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device Placement
  • Standard SVT Ablation
  • Surgical AFIb Ablation
  • Transcatheter AFib Ablation

See Report #C500, publishing June 2016.

From “Worldwide Wound Management, Forecast to 2024”, Report #S251, published December 2015

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Source: Report #S251.

Selected Medtech Fundings, May 2016

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Source: Compiled by MedMarket Diligence, LLC

During the month of June 2016, our opt-in blog readers are eligible for 30% off any MedMarket Diligence report (not valid with other offers). To take advantage of this, order any report from an online link at mediligence.com (or go to store) and, at checkout, enter the coupon code “Optinthirtyoff” to save 30%.

Pending Reports from MedMarket Diligence:

  • Global Nanomedical Technologies, Markets and Opportunities, 2016-2021. Details.
  • Global Dynamics of Surgical and Interventional Cardiovascular Procedures, 2015-2022. Details.
  • Worldwide Markets for Medical and Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Hemostats, 2015-2022. Details.

Patrick Driscoll
(patrick)
MedMarket Diligence

Biotech, advanced materials in wound management

Screen Shot 2016-05-31 at 12.05.46 PM

Source: “Worldwide Wound Management, Forecast to 2024”; Report #S251.

Sealants, hemostats, glues — future markets foreseen

From our past coverage of surgical sealants, glues, hemostats in our 2014 Report #S192.  (See the forthcoming June 2016 report, “Worldwide Markets for Medical and Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Hemostats, 2015-2022”, Report #S290.)

Fibrin and synthetic sealants offer a significant advantage over pure hemostats because they do not rely on the full complement of blood factors to produce hemostasis. Sealants provide all the components necessary to prevent bleeding and will often prevent bleeding from tissues where blood flow is under pressure and the damage is extensive.

CryoLife
Source: CryoLife

These products have the potential to replace sutures in some cases where speed and strength of securement are priorities for the surgical procedure.

Biologically active sealants typically contain various formulations of fibrin and/or thrombin, either of human or animal origin, which mimic or facilitate the final stages of the coagulation cascade. The most common consist of a liquid fibrin sealant product in which fibrinogen and thrombin are stored separately as a frozen liquid or lyophilized powder. Before use, both components need to be reconstituted or thawed and loaded into a two-compartment applicator device that allows mixing of the two components just prior to delivery to the wound. Because of the laborious preparation process, these products are not easy to use. However, manufacturers have been developing some new formulations designed to make the process more user friendly. Leaders in biologic surgical sealant space include Baxter International and Johnson & Johnson’s Ethicon Biosurgery division, but there are a number of smaller suppliers as well, in what has become an increasingly crowded field.

Compared to biologically active sealants containing fibrin and other human- or animal-derived products, synthetic sealants represent a much larger segment of the sealant market in terms of the number of competitors, variety of products, and next-generation products in development. Non-active synthetic sealants do not contain ingredients such as fibrin that actively mediate the blood clotting cascade, rather they act as mechanical hemostats, binding with or adhering to the tissues to help stop or prevent active bleeding during surgery.

Synthetic sealants represent an active category for R&D investment in large part because they offer several advantages over fibrin-based and other biologically active sealants. First and foremost, they are not derived from animal or human donor sources and thus eliminate the risks of disease transmission. Moreover, they are typically easier to use than biological products, often requiring no mixing or special storage, and many of these products have demonstrated improved sealing strength versus their biological counterparts. Synthetic products also have the potential to be more cost-effective than their biologically active counterparts. Leaders in the synthetic surgical sealants space include Baxter International Inc., CryoLife, CR Bard, and Ethicon/J&J; however, there are many up-and-coming competitors operating in this segment of the market with some interesting next-generation technologies that could gain significant traction in the years ahead. Moreover, unlike the fibrin sealants segment, where most products have more general indications for surgical hemostasis, a good number of competitors in the synthetic sealant field are focused on specific clinical applications for their products, such as cardiovascular surgery, plastic surgery, or ophthalmic surgery.

Sealants-Hemostats-Glues-companies-by-type
Source: Report #S192 (pub. 2014)

The non-active hemostats segment of the market includes a variety of scaffolds, patches, sponges, putties, powders, and matrices made of various nonactive materials that act mechanically to stop/absorb active bleeding, often in conjunction with manual compression, during surgical procedures as well as emergency use. Many of the companies active in the first two market segments discussed above also participate in this sector, including Ethicon/J&J, CR Bard, Baxter, and CryoLife, but there are also many other companies that compete in the hemostats market worldwide.


MedMarket Diligence is completing a global analysis of medical and surgical sealants, glues, and hemostats to reveal the patterns of sales, product adoption rates, and the realized/unrealized opportunities for extant stakeholders inclusive of manufacturers, buyers, and the investment arena. Publishing in June 2016, Report #S290, “Worldwide Markets for Medical and Surgical Sealants, Glues, and Hemostats, 2015-2022”.

 

Wound healing factors; Growth in peripheral stenting; Nanomed applications

From our weekly email to blog subscribers…

Extrinsic Factors Affecting Wound Healing

From Report #S251, “Worldwide Wound Management, Forecast to 2024: Established and Emerging Products, Technologies and Markets in the Americas, Europe, Asia/Pacific and Rest of World.”

Extrinsic factors affecting wound healing include:

Mechanical stress
Debris
Temperature
Desiccation and maceration
Infection
Chemical stress
Medications
Other factors

Mechanical stress factors include pressure, shear, and friction. Pressure can result from immobility, such as experienced by a bed- or chair-bound patient, or local pressures generated by a cast or poorly fitting shoe on a diabetic foot. When pressure is applied to an area for sufficient time and duration, blood flow to the area is compromised and healing cannot take place. Shear forces may occlude blood vessels, and disrupt or damage granulation tissue. Friction wears away newly formed epithelium or granulation tissue and may return the wound to the inflammatory phase.

Debris, such as necrotic tissue or foreign material, must be removed from the wound site in order to allow the wound to progress from the inflammatory stage to the proliferative stage of healing. Necrotic debris includes eschar and slough. The removal of necrotic tissue is called debridement and may be accomplished by mechanical, chemical, autolytic, or surgical means. Foreign material may include sutures, dressing residues, fibers shed by dressings, and foreign material which were introduced during the wounding process, such as dirt or glass.

Temperature controls the rate of chemical and enzymatic processes occurring within the wound and the metabolism of cells and tissue engaged in the repair process. Frequent dressing changes or wound cleansing with room temperature solutions may reduce wound temperature, often requiring several hours for recovery to physiological levels. Thus, wound dressings that promote a “cooling” effect, while they may help to decrease pain, may not support wound repair.

Desiccation of the wound surface removes the physiological fluids that support wound healing activity. Dry wounds are more painful, itchy, and produce scab material in an attempt to reduce fluid loss. Cell proliferation, leukocyte activity, wound contraction, and revascularization are all reduced in a dry environment. Epithelialization is drastically slowed in the presence of scab tissue that forces epithelial cells to burrow rather than freely migrate over granulation tissue. Advanced wound dressings provide protection against desiccation.

Maceration resulting from prolonged exposure to moisture may occur from incontinence, sweat accumulation, or excess exudates. Maceration can lead to enlargement of the wound, increased susceptibility to mechanical forces, and infection. Advanced wound products are designed to remove sources of moisture, manage wound exudates, and protect skin at the edges of the wound from exposure to exudates, incontinence, or perspiration.

Infection at the wound site will ensure that the healing process remains in the inflammatory phase. Pathogenic microbes in the wound compete with macrophages and fibroblasts for limited resources and may cause further necrosis in the wound bed. Serious wound infection can lead to sepsis and death. While all ulcers are considered contaminated, the diagnosis of infection is made when the wound culture demonstrates bacterial counts in excess of 105 microorganisms per gram of tissue. The clinical signs of wound infection are erythema, heat, local swelling, and pain.

Chemical stress is often applied to the wound through the use of antiseptics and cleansing agents. Routine, prolonged use of iodine, peroxide, chlorhexidine, alcohol, and acetic acid has been shown to damage cells and tissue involved in wound repair. Their use is now primarily limited to those wounds and circumstances when infection risk is high. The use of such products is rapidly discontinued in favor of using less cytotoxic agents, such as saline and nonionic surfactants.

Medication may have significant effects on the phases of wound healing. Anti-inflammatory drugs such as steroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may reduce the inflammatory response necessary to prepare the wound bed for granulation. Chemotherapeutic agents affect the function of normal cells as well as their target tumor tissue; their effects include reduction in the inflammatory response, suppression of protein synthesis, and inhibition of cell reproduction. Immunosuppressive drugs reduce WBC counts, reducing inflammatory activities and increasing the risk of wound infection.

Other extrinsic factors that may affect wound healing include alcohol abuse, smoking, and radiation therapy. Alcohol abuse and smoking interfere with body’s defense system, and side effects from radiation treatments include specific disruptions to the immune system, including suppression of leukocyte production that increases the risk of infection in ulcers. Radiation for treatment of cancer causes secondary complications to the skin and underlying tissue. Early signs of radiation side effects include acute inflammation, exudation, and scabbing. Later signs, which may appear four to six months after radiation, include woody, fibrous, and edematous skin. Advanced radiated skin appearances can include avascular tissue and ulcerations in the circumscribed area of the original radiation. The radiated wound may not become evident until as long as 10-20 years after the end of therapy.

Source: “Wound Management to 2024”, Report #S251.


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Source: “Global Market Opportunities in Peripheral Arterial and Venous Stents, Forecast to 2020”, Report #V201.


Selected Therapeutic and Diagnostic Applications of Nanotechnology in Medicine

Below are selected applications for neuromedical technologies in development or on the market currently.

Drug Delivery
Chemotherapy drug delivery
Magnetic nanoparticles attached to cancer cells
Nanoparticles carrying drugs to arterial wall plaques
Therapeutic magnetic carriers (TMMC) [guided using magnetic resonance navigation, or MRN]

Drugs and Therapies
Diabetes
Combatting antimicrobial resistance
Alzheimer’s Disease
Infectious Disease
Arthritis

Tissue, cell and genetic engineering involving nanomedical tools
Nanomedical tools in gene therapy for inherited diseases
Artificial kidney
ACL replacements
Ophthalmology
Implanted nanodevices for alleviation of pain

Biomaterials 

Nanomedicine and Personalized Treatments

Source: Report #T650, “Global Nanomedical Technologies, Markets and Opportunities, 2016-2021”. Report #T650.

Wound management regional growth (“rest of north america”)

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From Report S251 (see global analysis and the above detail for Americas (with detail for U.S., Rest of North America and Latin America), Europe (United Kingdom, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, and Rest of Europe), Asia/Pacific (Japan, Korea, and Rest of Asia/Pacific) and Rest of World.

Do you wish to see excerpts from “Worldwide Wound Management, Forecast to 2024: Established and Emerging Products, Technologies and Markets”?