Growth of Ablation Technologies, Applications, Worldwide

The growth in sales of a medical technology is dictated by a unique combination of a specific technology in a specific clinical application in a specific geographic market.

In the Smithers Apex report, The Future of Tissue Ablation Products to 2020, the markets for the different ablation technology types were assessed per application in each of the major world geographies. See the groupings, below:

Ablation Types and Clinical Applications:

  • Electrosurgical/radiofrequency
    • Cardiac
    • Surgical
  • Microwave
    • Oncologic
    • Urologic
  • Laser
    • Aesthetic
    • Ophthalmic
    • Surgical
  • External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT)
    • LINAC Systems
    • Cobalt-60
  • Cryoablation
    • Cardiac & Vascular
    • Oncologic Surgery
    • GYN Surgery
    • Dermal/Cutaneous Surgical
  • Ultrasound
    • Ophthalmic (Cataract) Surgical
    • Multipurpose Surgical
    • Urologic Surgical
    • Multipurpose High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

Geographic Areas:

  • United States & Other Americas
  • Largest Western & European States
  • Major Asian States
  • Rest of World

The Smithers Apex report contains the detailed assessment of ablation technology sales in each combination of technology, geography and clinical application. Below is illustrated graphically, sorted by compound annual growth rate in sales, each of the combinations.

Growth of Ablation Technologies by Clinical Application and Geography, 2014-2020

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Source: Smithers Apex

 

Ablation technologies to reach $16.8 billion

In 2013, energy-based tissue ablation tools and techniques were used in hundreds of millions of procedures required, generating an estimated $12.4 billion in cumulative global sales. These total sales are projected to register a healthy growth over the forecast to the year 2020, reaching $16.8 billion by that time.

A new report published by Smithers Apex covers the global market for energy-based tissue ablation products. See link.

New technologies at Medtech Startups, November 2014

Below is a list of the technologies under development at companies recently identified and included in the Medtech Startups Database.

  • Handheld ultrasound, MRI imaging device.
  • Needle-free injection drug delivery.
  • Lenses designed to correct imbalance between eyes and brain that cause certain migraines.
  • Continuous blood glucose monitoring in diabetes.
  • Customized prosthetic aortic valve.
  • Cystoscope-implanted, stent-like device to treat urinary obstruction associated with benign prostatic hypertrophy.
  • Endovascular treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm.
  • Respiratory therapy device based on “high frequency chest wall oscillation” for treatment of COPD, other respiratory disorders.
  • Treatment of arrhythmia.
  • Medical device commercialization company active in cardiovascular care, tissue ablation, medical infusions, hand surgery and laparoscopic surgery.
  • Surgical visualization systems.
  • Arthroscopic bone tunneler and other orthopedic surgical instrumentation.
  • Brain stimulation to treat multiple disorders.

See link for a month-by-month listing of the technologies at companies in the Medtech Startups Database.

Reconstructive surgery is increasingly aesthetic

Reconstructive surgery is the subset of “plastic” surgery focused on correcting the anatomy, aesthetics, or both, for patients who have been treated for disease or trauma, which sets it apart from purely aesthetic procedures performed for people wishing to improve their appearance above and beyond what they were given by birth (excluding congenital defects) or to reduce the signs of aging.

Given the volume of the non-clinically-indicated aesthetic procedures, and their increasingly sophisticated techniques and technologies, reconstructive surgery specialists have integrated aesthetics advances and can now achieve spectacular results that go well beyond the simple reconstructive procedures of the past, which were much less effective in concealing the trace evidence of disease and trauma.

By far, the most common reconstructive procedures are to address the physical appearance resulting from the removal of tumors. In the U.S. alone, reconstruction for tumor removal is performed over 4 million times annually. The remainder of reconstructive procedures covers a gamut of major and minor trauma and diseases.

Below is the distribution of non-aesthetic (only) reconstructive procedures in the U.S.

reconstructive-pie

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S710.

Through 2018, the global medical reconstructive and aesthetic products market is expected to reach a value of about $10.7 billion. Energy-based products such as lasers will experience the highest growth level. In most geographical regions and particularly in the U.S. and Europe, there is a growing consumer demand for medical cosmetic procedures and through 2020, even the lower income groups are likely to demand for more procedures, as the treatments become increasingly main stream. During the past few years, practitioners in the U.S. were rather forced to implement discounts and now with the revival of the economy, the total fee growth is likely to rebound. Successful companies in the sector mostly rely on a formula for continued research and development, pursuing additional, new business opportunities to increase expertise and product offerings. These companies remain solidly active in the eyes of high-end dermatologists, plastic and cosmetic surgeons.  As the aesthetic market is all about new products, the companies will be left behind, if they do not come up a new product every now and then.


This post is drawn from, “Global Markets for Products and Technologies in Aesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2013-2018″, Report #S710, published by MedMarket Diligence, LLC.  For details, see link/a>.

Shifting demand, sales in aesthetics and reconstructive products markets

Data from our report, “Global Markets for Products and Technologies in Aesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2013-2018″, illustrates the changing demand for different procedures in aesthetics and reconstructive medicine, which is resulting in projected shifts in the sales of products.

Below is are the compound annual growth rates (CAGRs) for North American sales in the major types of aesthetic and reconstructive procedures.

Screen Shot 2014-05-29 at 10.44.45 AM

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S710.

Where will medicine be 20 years from now?

My answer (edited) from this question on Quora.

I can speculate on this from the perspective of clinical practice and medical technology, but it should be first noted that another, important determinant of “where medicine will be” is the set of dynamics and forces behind healthcare delivery systems, including primarily the payment method, especially regarding reimbursement. It is clear that some form of reform in healthcare will result in a consolidation of the infrastructure paying for and managing patient populations. The infrastructure is bloated and expensive, unnecessarily adding to costs that neither the federal government nor individuals can sustain. This is not to say that I predict movement to a single payer system — that is just one perceived solution to the problem. There are far too many costs in healthcare that offer no benefits in terms of quality; indeed, such costs are a true impediment to quality. Funds that go to infrastructure (insurance companies and other intermediaries) and the demands they put on healthcare delivery work directly against quality of care. So, whether it is Obamacare, a single payer system, state administered healthcare (exchanges) or some other as-yet-unidentified form, there will be change in how healthcare is delivered from a cost/management perspective.

From the clinical practice and technology side, there will be enormous changes to healthcare. Here are examples of what I see from tracking trends in clinical practice and medical technology development:

  • Cancer 5 year survival rates will, for many cancers, be well over 90%. Cancer will largely be transformed in most cases to chronic disease that can be effectively managed by surgery, immunology, chemotherapy and other interventions.
  • Diabetes Type 1 (juvenile onset) will be managed in most patients by an “artificial pancreas”, a closed loop glucometer and insulin pump that will self-regulate blood glucose levels. OR, stem cell or other cell therapies may well achieve success in restoring normal insulin production and glucose metabolism in Type 1 patients. The odds are better that a practical, affordable artificial pancreas will developed than stem or other cell therapy, but both technologies are moving aggressively and will gain dramatic successes within 20 years.
  • Diabetes Type 2 (adult onset) will be a significant problem governed by different dynamics than Type 1. A large body of evidence will exist that shows dramatically reduced incidence of Type 2 associated with obesity management (gastric bypass, satiety drugs, etc.) that will mitigate the growing prevalence of Type 2, but research into pharmacologic or other therapies may at best achieve only modest advances. The problem will reside in the complexity of different Type 2 manifestation, the late onset of the condition in patients who are resistant to the necessary changes in lifestyle and the global epidemic that will challenge dissemination of new technologies and clinical practices to third world populations.
  • Cell therapy and tissue engineering will offer an enormous number of solutions for conditions currently treated inadequately, if at all. Below is an illustration of the range of applications currently available or in development, a list that will expand (along with successes in each) over the next 20 years.
  • Gene therapy will be an option for a majority of genetically-based diseases (especially inherited diseases) and will offer clinical options for non-inherited conditions. Advances in the analysis of inheritance and expression of genes will also enable advanced interventions to either ameliorate or actually preempt the onset of genetic disease.
  • Drug development will be dramatically more sophisticated, reducing the development time and cost while resulting in drugs that are far more clinically effective (and less prone to side effects). This arises from drug candidates being evaluated via distributed processing systems (or quantum computer systems) that can predict efficacy and side effect without need of expensive and exhaustive animal or human testing.
  • Most surgical procedures will achieve the ability to be virtually non-invasive. Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery will enable highly sophisticated surgery without ever making an abdominal or other (external) incision. Technologies like “gamma knife” and similar will have the ability to destroy tumors or ablate pathological tissue via completely external, energy-based systems.
  • Information technology will radically improve patient management. Very sophisticated electronic patient records will dramatically improve patient care via reduction of contraindications, predictive systems to proactively manage disease and disease risk, and greatly improve the decision-making of physicians tasked with diagnosing and treating patients.
  • Systems biology will underlie the biology of most future medical advances in the next 20 years. Systems biology is a discipline focused on an integrated understanding of cell biology, physiology, genetics, chemistry, and a wide range of other individual medical and scientific disciplines. It represents an implicit recognition of an organism as an embodiment of multiple, interdependent organ systems and its processes, such that both pathology and wellness are understood from the perspective of the sum total of both the problem and the impact of possible solutions.


There will be many more unforeseen medical advances achieved within 20 years, many arising from research that may not even be imagined yet. However, the above advances are based on actual research and/or the advances that have already arisen from that research.

Medtech Market Reports for the Resource-Constrained

As often as I gather data on medtech startups, I find myself frequently talking to eager entrepreneurs who are very enthusiastic about their technologies while confidentially bemoaning how hard it is to operate when they are pre-funded or otherwise bootstrapped.

I also frequently connect with academics, many working on their “thesis” and in dire need of market data but unable to afford the full list prices on our market and technology reports (which I find dubious unless their email address ends in “.edu”).

Therefore, it seemed appropriate that I find a way to satisfy these eager would-be or otherwise cash-strapped entrepreneurs with a means to get useful data to help guide their businesses and even, potentially, support their fundraising efforts. What I have come up with is a selection of our full scale, global, proprietary market reports and made them available at what I’ve termed the “market starter” price of $125 each. These reports are indeed the full reports (300 to 500 pages in length, typically market priced at $3,000 or higher), but they are two or more years old — still eminently relevant in the broad coverage of market size, growth and, in particular, forecasts.

Thus far the topics of these Market Starter reports are:

  • Ablation Technologies
  • Spine Surgery
  • Obesity Management
  • Diabetes Management
  • Tissue Engineering & Cell Therapy

These reports are listed with links to the full descriptions and tables of contents, at link.