Clinical utility of advanced wound closure and securement products

Products for the advanced securement of wounds — stopping bleeding, sealing the wound, tightly closing the wound and preventing post-surgical adhesions — will be accepted by clinicians (and paid for by healthcare systems) to the extent that the provide very specific clinical utility compared to traditional alternatives, many of which (like sutures and tapes) are simple to use, cost little and otherwise are readily accepted in the business of wound management.

Clinicians (and healthcare systems) will accept and adopt for routine use those new products for hemostasis, closure, sealing and anti-adhesion of wounds, whether chronic or acute, based on the level of clinical utility they provide compared to those traditional products, and the extent to which those new products provide utility is based on the types of utility provided (from “critical” to “perceived”), a metric that varies by clinical specialty.  For example, a new product that prevents bleeding and dramatically reduces morbidity is much more likely to be adopted than a product that yields merely aesthetic (e.g., reduced scarring) or perceived benefits that have no impact on morbidity.

Advanced products offer different degrees of utility from, on the high end, the value of enabling procedures otherwise not possible or highly impractical to, on the low end, perceived benefits with no significant positive impact on morbidity.  Further, the impact of advanced products varies by clinical specialty, with some expected differences between, for example, cardiology procedures and cosmetic procedures. The four main categories of benefit from advanced products include:

  • Important and Enabling: Important to prevent excessive bleeding and transfusion, to ensure safe procedure, and to avoid mortality and to avoid complications associated with excessive bleeding and loss of blood.
  • Improved Clinical Outcome: Reduces morbidity due to improved procedure, reduced surgery time, and prevention of complications such as fibrosis, post-surgical adhesion formation, and infection (includes adjunct to minimally invasive surgery).
  • Cost-Effective and Time-Saving: Immediate reduction in surgical treatment time and follow-up treatments.
  • Aesthetic and Perceived Benefits: Selection is driven by aesthetic and perceived benefits, resulting in one product being favored over a number of medically equivalent treatments.

Below is illustrated the distribution — by clinical category — of the kind of utility provided by advanced wound securement products (fibrin and other sealants, high strength adhesives, hemostatic products and anti-adhesion products):

cardio

 Total: 51.4 million procedures
Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S190.

cosmetic

Total: 12.7 million procedures
Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S190.

 digestive

Total: 20.9 million procedures
Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S190.

 

general

Total: 27.4 million procedures
Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S190.

 

neuro

Total: 16 million procedures
Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S190.

ortho

Total: 10.8 million procedures
Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S190.

 

 

Published by

P. Driscoll

Patrick Driscoll founded MedMarket Diligence and has become a leading source of analysis and insight in medical technology markets. He previously co-founded Medtech Insight and was a principal at Medical Data International. He has 25 years of experience assessing current and potential markets for medical technologies.

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