When a Startup is No Longer a Startup (I mean, really)

Below is a list of “startup” companies that I see will be presenting at a recently announced industry conference.  Given my interest in newly formed companies — “new” as in “recent” or, let’s say, within the last 1-2 years — I was intrigued to see when these startups were founded. After running through them with my resources, I quickly determined that these companies were started an average of almost 6-1/2 years ago:

  • Accel Diagnostics – 2008
  • Aethlon – 2000
  • CytoPherx – 2007
  • Domain Surgical – 2009
  • Endoscape – 2005
  • Harbor Medtech – 2010
  • HemoSonics – 2004
  • Histosonics – 2009
  • ImpetoMedical – 2005
  • Integrity Applications – registration shows “founded” in 2010, but received F&S award in 2008
  • Kaer Biotherapeutics – 2008
  • LeibnizInstitute for Plasma Science and Technology – Not a “company”, but originated as institute in 1946, dissolved then refounded in 1992
  • LKC Technologies – 1987
  • Materna Medical – 2010
  • MGI Medical – ?? has no corporate filing anywhere
  • Monteris Medical – 2006
  • NexHand – 2011
  • OncoSec Medical – 2010
  • OpenCell Biomed – 2008? (press report in that year, but a Canadian company without a registration)
  • OrthoRebirth Co. Ltd. – 2011
  • Poiesis Medical – 2009
  • Pulsar Vascular – 2005
  • Sigma Instruments Holdings – 1998 (Sigma Instruments)
  • Soft Tissue Regeneration – 2008
  • Stndrd Infusion – 2010
  • Suspension Orthopaedic Solutions – 2008
  • Thayer Intellectual Property – 2009
  • Therapeutic Monitoring Systems – 2001
  • TrueVision 3D Surgical – 2003
  • Unisense Fertilitech – 2003
  • UroNano – ??
  • Vascular Access Technologies – 2010
  • VertiFlex – 2004

I have tracked these companies and in fact with the exception of only a few (such as those founded pre-2003, for which you can find info basically anywhere) have all of them detailed in our Medtech Startups Database.

Why do I bring this list up?  Well, the key is that the more difficult it is to find information (IMHO), the more valuable it is and that’s why I am so focused on finding the most recently founded companies, so young that their stories have not yet been told (I love the challenge of “stealth” companies) and in whom my well-funded VC and mid/large-cap medtech companies are hungrily interested.  And, if you are going to go to the trouble to attend an industry meeting, such as on medtech “startups”, involving airfare, hotel and other expense, don’t you want to spend your business time connecting with, well, closer to actual startups, like companies who are (1) not already well known to everybody, (2) not already publicly traded, (3) not tired and travel-worn from having made their pitch already countless times before and (4) actually based on recent clinical and/or technology advances that make their value proposition actually valuable?

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