Surgical procedures penetrated by sealants, glues, hemostats and anti-adhesion products

Approximately 140 million wounds (acute and chronic) are created annually worldwide that offer potential for use of adjunctive surgical closure and securement products; approximately 42 million of these wounds are created during surgical procedures in the United States.

Although healing of all these wounds might be improved through use of adjunctive surgical closure and securement products, it is likely that increased usage of these products will be limited, on clinical, economic and other grounds, to a fraction of procedures. It is realistically estimated that 10%–15% of these procedures would benefit from increased use of newly developed adjunctive surgical closure and securement products.

The criteria driving which surgical procedures take up adjunctive surgical closure and securement products include clinical utility, cost effectiveness, aesthetic/perceived benefits and others, and (for the sake of understanding) can be grouped into the following categories:

 

The relative numbers of surgical procedures, grouped by these categories and clinical area, are illustrated below.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S190.

2 thoughts on “Surgical procedures penetrated by sealants, glues, hemostats and anti-adhesion products”

  1. According to this post approximately 140 million surgical-based wounds are created annually worldwide, but the post titled “Wound prevalence and healing times” on February 29th 2012 shows a prevalence of approximately 114 million wounds worldwide. Could you please help me clarify these numbers? Thank you very much.

  2. The figure of 140 million is the total number of wounds including both acute surgical wounds (e.g., wounds created in surgery as part of a surgical procedure) and chronic wounds. The text in this post has been amended to reflect the figure as the total of acute and chronic wounds. The figure of $114 million in the later post is referencing the number of strictly the surgically created wounds (as opposed to those created by trauma or disease). Sorry for the confusion.

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