Surgical Closure and Securement Products — The End of Sutures?

The market potential for products in the surgical securement field is driven by a combination of new technologies coming to market and expanding caseload for which these technologies are applicable. The potential for these products continues to grow as surgical practices improve and the benefits of new products address the requirement for fast and effective closure.

We forecast that approximately 70 million procedures around the world might benefit from products in this category in the future, and due to demographic trends and evolving surgical capabilities, this number is forecast to increase at an annualized rate of 3%–5%.

In the coming decade we will see strong penetration of new therapies into new procedure areas and some new introductory techniques for treatment of orthopedic, cardiovascular and neurological procedures.

The question that is raised is whether the advance of novel closure and securement products heralds the end of surgical sutures.  The answer is no, of course.

Surgical sealants, high strength glues, hemostatic agents and other technologies in wound closure have clearly begun to replace sutures for a number of applications.   The ability to achieve tighter closure, produce less blood loss and eliminate the need for suture removal or the concern about the efficacy of dissolving sutures has allowed these advanced closure products to displace sutures in the market.  However, compared to sutures, the lesser strength of the bond formed by sealants and glues, the potential for toxicity in glues/sealants, the sometimes more challenging practices in applying sealants and glues (including being administered in laparoscopic surgeries), and other drawbacks have kept the doors open at suture manufacturers.  The reality is that surgical sealants and glues will be steadily developed to take over greater share of caseload traditionally handled by sutures, but for the time being will be limited to many external applications, hemostasis-only  roles, or even complementary use with sutures to augment the sealing of suture lines.

Below is a table, with definitions, of the main components of the wound closure and securement market:

    
Dressing categoryProduct examplesDescriptionPotential applications
FilmHydrofilm, Release, Tegaderm, BioclusiveComes as adhesive, thin transparent polyurethane film, and as a dressing with a low adherent pad attached to the film.Clean, dry wounds, minimal exudate; also used to cover and secure underlying absorptive dressing, and on hard-to-bandage locations, such as heel.
FoamPermaFoam
PolyMem
Biatain
Polyurethane foam dressing available in sheets or in cavity filling shapes. Some foam dressing have a semipermeable, waterproof layer as the outer layer of the dressingFacilitates a moist wound environment for healing. Used to clean granulating wounds which have minimal exudate.
HydrogelHydrosorb Gel Sheet, Purilon, Aquasorb, DuoDerm, Intrasite Gel, GranugelColloids which consist of polymers that expand in water. Available in gels, sheets, hydrogel-impregnated dressings.Provides moist wound environment for cell migration, reduces pain, helps to rehydrate eschar. Used on dry, sloughy or necrotic wounds.
HydrocolloidCombiDERM, Hydrocoll, Comfeel, DuoDerm CGF Extra Thin, Granuflex, Tegasorb, Nu-DermMade of hydroactive or hydrophilic particles attached to a hydrophobic polymer. The hydrophilic particles absorb moisture from the wound, convert it to a gel at the interface with the wound. Conforms to wound surface; waterproof and bacteria proof.Gel formation at wound interface provides moist wound environment. Dry necrotic wounds, or for wounds with minimal exudate. Also used for granulating wounds.
AlginateAlgiSite, Sorbalgon Curasorb, Kaltogel, Kaltostat, SeaSorb, TegagelA natural polysaccharide derived from seaweed; available in a range of sizes, as well as in ribbons and ropes.Because highly absorbent, used for wounds with copious exudate. Can be used in rope form for packing exudative wound cavities or sinus tracts.
AntimicrobialBiatain Ag
Atrauman Ag
MediHoney
Both silver and honey are used as antimicrobial elements in dressings.Silver: Requires wound to be moderately exudative to activate the silver, in order to be effective
NPWDSNa
V.A.C. Ulta
PICO
Renasys (not in USA)
Prospera PRO series
Invia Liberty
Computerized vacuum device applies continuous or intermittent negative or sub-atmospheric pressure to the wound surface. NPWT accelerates wound healing, reduces time to wound closure. Comes in both stationary and portable versions.May be used for traumatic acute wound, open amputations, open abdomen, etc. Seems to increase burn wound perfusion. Also used in management of DFUs. Contraindicated for arterial insufficiency ulcers. Not to be used if necrotic tissue is present in over 30% of the wound.
Bioengineered Skin and Skin SubstitutesAlloDerm, AlloMax, FlexHD, DermACELL, DermaMatrix, DermaPure, Graftjacket Regenerative Tissue Matrix, PriMatrix, SurgiMend PRS, Strattice Reconstructive Tissue Matrix, Permacol, EpiFix, OASIS Wound Matrix, Apligraf, Dermagraft, Integra Dermal Regeneration Template, TransCyteBio-engineered skin and soft tissue substitutes may be derived from human tissue (autologous or allogeneic), xenographic, synthetic materials, or a composite of these materials.Burns, trauma wounds, DFUs, VLUs, pressure ulcers, postsurgical breast reconstruction, bullous diseases

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S180, “Worldwide Surgical Sealants, Glues, Wound Closure and Anti-Adhesion Markets, 2008-2015.” October 2010.

Leave a Reply